Black leaves on orchid plant

Discussion in 'Orchidaceae (orchids)' started by bh4bhwgm, Oct 27, 2008.

  1. bh4bhwgm

    bh4bhwgm Member

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    I have an orchid plant approx. 10-12" tall purchased about two weeks ago. I have watered the plant twice and after the first time I noticed black leaves that had fallen off. I changed the pot and bark, cut off the black and used cinnamon on the new cuts and read the cure for fungus was peroxide, lysterine, or fungicide. I used peroxide, cinnamon, and have just used fungicide on the plant. When I used the fungicide today I notice more black leaves had fallen off. Can anyone help? Thanks.
     
  2. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    What is the condition of the roots? Has the plant been waterlogged/overwatered/frozen? Was mold present in the old potting medium? To what genus/species does your orchid belong? Under what conditions was it growing, and what environment does it have now (light, temperature, air movement)? How many leaves does it have left? Any sign of disease elsewhere on the plant?
    And: can you post a photo?
     
  3. bh4bhwgm

    bh4bhwgm Member

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    If anything, it might under watered from a reply I received from someone else. The root system looked good(white) and seemed pliable when I repotted the plant. It is a red ? cattleya I purchased from the local Lowes and the leaves appeared healthy with about 9 leaves -about 4 grown leaves. I had the plant near a window on the east side of my home (in the breakdfast area) and now have moved it to one on the south side where it will get lots more light. The plant is on a pedestal (24" ?) high. I could put a small fan where the air would continusously circulate. I did not douse the plant with water but the last watering I poured about a half gall of fertilized water over the bark and roots of the plant. I have sprayed the plant and bark with a pesticide from GreenCure I thought was especially for orchids -containing potassium bicarbonate. I thought the plant might have a fungus and bought new bark, sterilized the pot, cut off the part of the leaves which had begun to turn black with a sterile knife and put cinnamon on the cuts as suggested by an orchid grower. After all of this I sprayed with a mist of pesticide from GreenCure. I can grow outside plants(which I do) and have grown indoor plants but this baffles me. It is almost to much pork for a shilling. Thanks for your help.
     
  4. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Hmm. Sounds as if you have done all that can be done. If this were my plant I'd leave it alone (aside from standard watering, etc.) for a while and see how it does. Make sure that the sun's rays are not too powerful on the cattleya...Years ago, I had one hanging out on my patio in what I THOUGHT was a nice location for it...when a spot developed on one of the leaves it took me longer than it should have to figure out that yes, even in this mostly shady area, the leaf was developing SUNSCORCH from only a few minutes a day of direct sunlight. ---I wised up in time, and still have the (healthy) plant.
    Let us know what happens, and good luck!
     
  5. bh4bhwgm

    bh4bhwgm Member

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    togata57: Thanks for your concern. Should I use a different fungicide? What I used was an 85% solution of potassium bicarbonate -not just for orchids.
     
  6. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Someone with greater expertise in the chemical area will have to answer that one for you.--- I'm just thinking that maybe just laying off the chemicals altogether might be a good idea, for a while. I think you have done a thorough job in that department, and now it's the plant's turn to rest up, gather its strength, and think about growing again. We humans can only do so much: ultimately the orchid decides its own fate. Sometimes all you do is in vain---but sometimes your efforts are rewarded by a plant that recovers and thrives. It (and you!) have had several major stresses in a bunch, so both of you need to breathe deeply and relax. ---It's a fact that orchids do take rest periods now and again: excellent idea! And orchids are not only beautiful, but amazingly tough. It sounds as though you are a most conscientious caretaker, and have done all you can. The rest is in the lap of the (orchid) gods!
     
  7. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I agree leave it and make sure all the conditions are optimum. [well drained medium filtered light etc.] Sometimes overdoing it can kill a plant as well. My only experience with orchids was cutting black leaves off 4,000 odd Cymbidiums as part of my holiday job with my father years ago. Oh and not to water over them but at the base. Good luck with it give it time

    Liz
     
  8. bh4bhwgm

    bh4bhwgm Member

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    Many thanks to all of you who have shared your knowledge. That means more than I can ever tell you. You are most kind indeed. Have a blessed day.
     

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