Identification: Black Friday special ?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by David Tang, Nov 16, 2018.

  1. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    The small black patches and bigger lumps are all on a fallen
    log. At first I thought they are part of the bark. Kindly
    ID if they are fungi please
     

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  2. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    Surfed again. Could it be Chaga ? with acclaimed medicinal property ?
     
  3. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi David - the small black lumpy patches appear to be a member of Hypoxylon genus: I can faintly see the shapes of perithecia on the surface of one. A possible ID is Annulohypoxylon multiforme but there are other Hypoxylons this could be. This belongs to the broad group of ascomyectes, like the Xylaria hypoxylon in a recent posting.

    The second photo looks a bit more like a distortion of the tree's structure, a category which can have fungal, viral or other causes, such as a burl. But I am not sure.

    Chaga, in the usual way this term is used, is a non-fertile structure produced by the fungus Inonotus obliquus, which is in the polypore group of fungi. It is almost always found on standing/living birch, though it has been known to have other hosts, far less commonly. I notice that due to the excitement around Chaga, folks are cutting hunks from tree burls, from non-host tree species. An interesting volunteer de-facto experiment is therefore in progress on the effect of regular tree burl tea consumption <grin>.
     
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  4. David Tang

    David Tang Active Member

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    From what I surfed, I came up with Hypoxylon multiforme.
    Is that the original naming of Annulohypoxylon multiforme.
    I hate this frequent splitting (possibly to get his name included
    in the new genus/species name), the end result being monospecific
    genus.

    Yes, often time I suspect the bigger ones are not fungus, but "callosity"
    from over healing growth on injured bark.
     
  5. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes Hypoxylon was the old name, and it will show in most books and online resources as that.
     

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