Best Pruner to use?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Shishi, Feb 8, 2007.

  1. Shishi

    Shishi Active Member

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    Best Pruner/Cutter to use?

    I wanted to ask everyone's opinion on the type of pruner that they use to prune their JMs.

    If I wanted to cut a side branch off and leave as little of a stub as possible, what is the best way to do it and with what type of pruner?

    So far, I have found either a Concave Cutter or a Rounded Concave Cutter seems to be designed for that purpose but I do not know the difference between the two and have not used either one.

    Thanks in advance for your reply and assistance.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2007
  2. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I use concave cutter !!is the best for me after close the cut whit mastic
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Felco #6 here.
     
  4. Dale B.

    Dale B. Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I believe that it is best to not prune too close to the node or main branch. Do not damage the coller that is at the base of the branch to be pruned. The concave cutters are special bonsi tools used to cut out scars. The tree will heal better if you do not damage the coller. Prune about 1/4 inch above the node. The branch will die back to the node. If you cut too close to the node and damage it, the chances are that it will die back to the next node.

    Dale
     
  5. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    I tend to agree with you.

    A concave cutter could be used, only if the branch collar was not removed. Typically, there should be a small bump left if the cut was done right.

    I use Corona Felco #2

    Primarily for twigs 3/8" and less.

    My Silky arborist saw works fine for larger, and I also have a smaller finer tooth folding saw with teeth of similar design as arborist saws.

    No more concave cutters in my collection anymore.
     
  6. kevinthompson

    kevinthompson Member

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  7. Orchidity

    Orchidity Member

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    I also recently bought a Felco F-2. A bit pricey as compared with the competition, but I suspect its the only pruner I will ever need to buy.
     
  8. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

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    My pruning choices for the garden landscape are listed below. I go for quality and value, but not always the most expensive.

    Use for thinnest branches to thickest:
    ARS SS380 Long Reach Bonsai Scissors
    ARS Needle Nose Pruner HP-SE45
    Corona Clipper Steel Floral Shears With Comfort Grip Handles FS 4200
    Corona BP 3125 Bypass Pruner
    ARS SA-IK10R Bonsai and Ikebana Saw
    ARS Pruning Folding Turbocut Saw with 6-1/2-Inch Curved Blade SA-GR17

    My favorite hedge shears ever:
    ARS 28- to 41-1/2-Inch Hedge Shears HS-K900Z
     
  9. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Well this is an old thread but what the heck. I have used Felco #2 for years. This Christmas I received a Felco #8. I have found the 8 to be great for getting a really precise cut on the edge of the branch collar. I do find the #2 has a little more strength, so I am currently using both. ;)
     
  10. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

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    I like Felco pruners, but must admit that since trying the Bahco Ergo line of ergonomic bypass pruners the Felco 8's hardly get used any more.

    The bahco's will not lay flat on a table as the handles do not line up with the blades, looking for all the world like a regular pair of secateurs that have been run over by a large truck. They are incredibly comfortable to use and the angles of the tool and the shape of the head allow for pruning in some remarkably tight places. They come in two lines, the PX which has replaceable parts similar to the Felco models, and the PG which is the budget version, lacking the replaceable parts but with the same blade quality and ergonomics. There are available with three sizes of blade and three sizes of handle which can be mix-and-matched, and are also available in left-handed versions (but only with the medium blade size).

    The Bahco pruners are the best I have ever used, but don't take my word for it; if anyone has any interest in learning more about them please read this review and the comments section below it (there is also a Youtube vid of someone explaining the ergonomics and features): Hand Pruner Showdown: Felco VS Corona VS Bahco


    (P.S. there are some other good quality pruners recommended in this thread:
    In search of a clean cut)
     
  11. JT1

    JT1 Contributor

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    After your recommendation, I picked up a pair of Bahco Ergo Bypass Pruner PX-M2. We used them all last year and they were our preferred pruner. For thinner branches, I still prefer my bonsai shears. This year we picked up some Okatsune Hand Pruners and they seem really nice. Using them on some indoor plants (since Winter will not give up), they are very precise and make a really clean cut on thin and soft twigs.

    I have a feeling the Bahco will remain our utility pruner for moderate cuts and the Okatsune will be our light to medium duty precision pruners, offering a very clean and precise cut. My bonsai shears are still my favorite for artistic pruning and developing complex branching on seasonal growth.

    Thought I would bring this thread back, since this is the time to update pruning tools for this upcoming growing season.

    MAF- Thanks for the recommendation on the Bahco pruners. I have used Felco in the past and I have to say that the Bahco has a great feel, quality, and they make a great cut! They are the work horse in our pruning arsenal.

    M. D. Vaden- I have done extensive research on the Silky pruning saw line and I plan to replace my current pruning saw with Silky when that time comes. Silky comes highly recommended.
     
  12. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

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    JT, glad you liked the Bahco secateurs, I still love mine too!

    As for the Silky saws I agree; they are sublime. I only have the Bigboy, which is a little too big for most Japanese maple work, unless you are dealing with 40+ year old trees, but it cuts through wood like butter, leaves a smooth cut surface, and the quality of the blade is superb.
     
  13. ROEBUK

    ROEBUK Contributor Maple Society

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    Please find a picture of my chosen "weapons" for the pruning trimming and sawing of JM

    Firstly i would not be without my Felco NO 11s these are especially for the large handed of gardeners for which i fall into!! these fit like the proverbial glove for me and give endless hours of comfort for various jobs around the garden.Secondly my Draper small Bonsai cutters for when you have to get in close and room is tight, then the best of what i think for cutting off limbs is the sturdy reliable good old Swiss army knife with the small saw attachment, have used various professional saws over the years but this thing will cut through anything any size absolutely swear by this!! you can put so much power into the handle with your hand plus with it been small just under 6" extended you can reach into the largest or smallest of areas with ease and it leaves the cleanest of cuts.
     

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