beetle bags a bust

Discussion in 'Garden Pest Management and Identification' started by kimmyk, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. kimmyk

    kimmyk Member

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    Location:
    New Haven County, CT, USA
    Hi. Where I live, the CT shoreline, Japanese beetles are a perennial problem. Even though their "busy" time is supposed to be late afternoon, I have always encountered them at night, presumably attracted by lights. Also, I've seen very few hanging out on my plants during the day.

    My yard is nearly 1/3 acre, and I have plants just about everywhere. Following the directions on the box precisely, I have placed beetle bags in three separate locations- downwind, the recommended distance from my plants etc. Not a single beetle was lured into any of the "Bag-a-Bugs." I have tried the traps in various spots around my yard and no beetles bit. Based on what I have read here and on the experience of people I know in my area, these bags fill in up no time with countless beetles. I know beetles are around b/c they hang out at night under the lights on my deck. So I assume that beetles are at least 1 of the pests munching on my leaves.

    Are the beetles in my yard exceptionally intelligent or am i doing something wrong? Any thoughts would be appreciated.
     
  2. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    Location:
    philly, pa, usa 6b
    they might not be japanese beetles and i doubt the attractant in the traps would work on other types (not sure about that, though).

    also, the jp's are done with for the year - main activity in your area would be july/august, i'd think (it's late june to early july here).
     
  3. constantgardener

    constantgardener Active Member 10 Years

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    flemington, united states
    the bags seem to attract far more beetles than they trap any way. When you see the beetles varies considerably (some areas here in New Jersey were reporting them in April this year, well before we should normally see them) but agree with Joclyn the adults should be gone by now. The adult beetles are bright metallic green, about 1/2 inch long; is that what you're seeing? Here's a link to Ohio State U. fact sheet with a pic that might be helpful: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/2000/2001.html. Your local extension office could help ID what ever beetle is visiting you.
     
  4. kimmyk

    kimmyk Member

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    Thank you both. Any ideas on what might be eating my plants since now it seems unlikely that the beetles are the culprit. A number of leaves on my raspberry bush have many small holes-- almost a lace effect. The other type of snacking taking place is larger bites(?) from the edge of the leaf. Some of the plants affected are a first season honeysuckle vine, peppers, and a number of flowering shrubs all planted this past spring.

    Thanks for the link, ConstantGardener. I will check it out.
     
  5. constantgardener

    constantgardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Lots of wee critters out there! Best would be to find them, second best to take samples of the foliage to your local extension center, third probably to post pics...but all that's a bit of work this late in the season. Everything is shutting down, getting ready for over wintering or dying, so I really wouldn't worry too much about it this late in the season. What ever did the dining could/probably is long gone by now. If it's just that you'd like to known, you could check the plants (especially under sides of leaves) when it's warmest during the day to see what's on them and go from there. Good luck!
     
  6. kimmyk

    kimmyk Member

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    Thanks everyone for your responses. I am printing them out to have on hand for spring.
     

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