Beeches: Beech hedge - liquid amber tree

Discussion in 'Fagaceae (beeches, oaks, etc.)' started by frasier, May 6, 2007.

  1. frasier

    frasier Member

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    Our beech hedge is approximately 1.5mtrs high x 18meters wide. It also has 6 beech decoration trees in it which render the beech hedge approx 2.5mtrs high at each tree top point. The hedge is very healthy. Recently somebody built a new house behind us taking away all privacy from our backgarden. We started to fertilize the beech hedge every two weeks and to water same in an effort to increase the growth levels. It has grown a little but not a lot. We then planted 3 liquidamber trees in the beech hedge to increase future privacy. This was 8 months ago. We recently had two gardeners view the issue. One suggested that beech hedges are very sensitive and to take out the liquid amber trees. The other suggested we leave them, that beech hedges were not sensitive and in fact we should also consider planting another faster growing hedge behind the existing beech hedge - thereby leaving us with 2 hedges and maximum privacy especially in winter. If I can manage to explain this - We live on the side of a hill. The beech hedge is growing on an elevated slope by the top of an italian terracotta tiled feature wall. The feature wall is approx 1 mtr high x 18mts wide and drops down into our garden. . The house is north facing, beside the bodensee lake region in southern germany.

    My questions are the following -
    - Are beech hedges very sensitive ?
    - Will the liquid amber trees affect it and should we take them out?
    - Should we consider planting another hedge along the back of the beech hedge ?
    - What annual growth levels should we expect from our beech hedge ?
    - Might the roots of the liquidamber tree dislodge the feature terracotta wall?
    - How on earth can we make our hedge grow really quickly over the next 6 months?
    - Can anyone give us any suggestions on regaining our much loved privacy please!

    Thank you
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If the beech is not sheared to produce a facsimile of an evergreen hedge via the retained dead leaves then you need to plant some evergreen plants. The sweetgum will not be as suitable for shearing and is a fast- and large-growing, comparatively coarse-textured, thick-twigged that will probably not blend with the beeches very well (unless you planted a slow-growing sweetgum cultivar such as one of the variegated ones).

    Beech is naturally slow-growing, specimens purchased from nurseries here have the normal slow growth so apparently even most commercial growers have not discovered how to "push" it. An improvement in yours resulting from fertilizing would probably be mostly a greener leaf color resulting in the nitrogen content of the fertilizer. Since it seems it was growing normally before you fertilized probably the fertilizer is not likely to generate an additional benefit. And fertilizers can poison the soil if overapplied. Best to sample your soil and have it tested before undertaking a frequently repeated fertilization regimen. You want to find out if there any nutrients that might need to be supplemented and which ones those are.
     
  3. frasier

    frasier Member

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    tx for your reply and sorry for late response. Unfortunately Im not sure which type of beech hedge I have - should find out though! - we diddnt plant it ourseleves, the hedge was here when we moved in. House is 7 years old - presume the hedge is round the same, has grown those lenghts in last 7 years - so yes, slow growing. Not entirely sure what you mean by 'If the beech is not sheared to produce a facsimile of an evergreen hedge via the retained dead leaves then you need to plant some evergreen plants', perhaps if u have some more time you could expand please. Tx for tips and taking time to reply.
     

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