bamboo in pots

Discussion in 'Poaceae' started by pbh, Apr 26, 2007.

  1. pbh

    pbh Member

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    what is the best type of bamboo to grow in pots outdoors.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Any will do, however if you are concerned about overwintering in containers hyperhardy fountain (Fargesia nitida) or umbrella (F. murielae) bamboos might be best. These are both also very compact (close-stemmed) and pretty.
     
  3. ShariN

    ShariN Member

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    I can say, sadly,, Blue fountain is not a good container Bamboo. My last one just went to seed. The one before this one, died in the same manner two years ago.
    Nice big pots,,protected from the afternoon sun.
    A very fragile bamboo.

    Only one I have doing well..am 620' up in edge of the NW Oregon Coastal mountains, is the Narihira Bamboo
     
  4. pbh

    pbh Member

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    Hi Ron B. How big a tub or container would I need to permanently grow a clump of black bamboo, which I plan to place against the East end wall of our house which gets the morning sun. We live in Vancopuver BC, so are in climate zone 7.

    pbh
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Black bamboo is not one I would choose as it flops over in rain, when sufficiently developed (large) making it quite a nuisance near access routes - and is not really all that hardy even in the ground (I think it's rated to about 0F). I have seen a hedge of it burned by the 1990 winter in Bellingham.

    The bigger the tub the bigger the growth of the plant and the more soil there is to resist freezing. Some clones of fountain bamboo are highly elegant, recently numerous other Fargesia species and related genera have been put on the general market here in NW USA by wholesale growers. Don't know if SW BC is sharing in this resource. With a plant hardy to -20F tub culture should never be a problem in maritime BC, can't say that with certainty for one good only to 0F.

    New generation seedlings of fountain bamboo are available, it will possibly be over a hundred years before these flower.
     
  6. ShariN

    ShariN Member

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    Humm,, so you are saying there are better" Blue fountains" out there now?
    Loved that bamboo but wasn't impressed with them going to seed. I was told they only go to seed every 90 years or so..but mine did not seem to follow that plan. Very spendy plants to loose them like I have.
    What place in OR would be the best to buy them from?
     
  7. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    The blue fountain bamboo was introduced to cultivation ~90 years ago by seed. From that inital introduction, some desirable seedlings resulted that were named & propagated. Fast forward to about 5 years ago & all the Fargesia nitida & murielae clones in cultivation were from that initial introduction and their number just rang. Except for a few stragglers, they have all flowered now and the plants for sale are from the newest generation should be good for another 90 years.

    Simon
     
  8. ShariN

    ShariN Member

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    Thank you for letting me know.
     
  9. dkg091065

    dkg091065 Active Member

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    Bamboo that grows in "clumps" is what you need for pots, "running bamboo" will not do well at all.
     
  10. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    I grow black bamboo in a container 24 inches across, and 18 inches deep. The container gets overfilled with rhizomes after about 3-4 years and need dividing. But I am usually able to leave the thickest culms in the same container for maximum ornamental effect.

    Once the container gets filled up with roots and rhizomes, the bamboo needs to be divided as soon as possible, as it is often impossible to provide water fast enough to keep it healthy. However, I usually divide before the container gets completely overcrowded, as the expanding mass of rhizome will easily rupture even the strongest of nursery containers.
     

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