baldsmith? yes? no?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by graftedmaplecollector, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. graftedmaplecollector

    graftedmaplecollector Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    louisiana
    This is my first baldsmith in the ground. It doesn't really look too orange to
    me. I know that soil and other things affect color, but I thought I might just
    see what everyone thinks of this one. It's mulched in ground magnolia leaves and
    partially under a magnolia tree.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. seventrees

    seventrees Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Louisiana, USA
    graftedmaplecollector

    This is my first year with a baldsmith, size and appearance very similar, though mine is potted. I really like the look of the leaves, less coarse than many other green cultivars.

    How long have you been using ground magnolia leaves as mulch? This is my first time reading of such. Have you found any advantages to their use as opposed to other mulches such as pine bark? I ask because my neighbor has a magnolia tree that will provide me with an ample supply of leaves should I decide to use them.

    Also, is that structure around your baldsmith simply for protection, or to promote vertical growth?

    I've been reading this forum for years to gain knowledge about growing Japanese maples, and today I finally registered, in large part to attain feedback relating to the two questions above.

    Thanks
    seventrees
     
  3. graftedmaplecollector

    graftedmaplecollector Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    louisiana
    I use them mainly because that's what I have the most of, but I find that the baldsmith loves it. It breaks down into a blackish acidic compost that has this dissectum out growing all of my others. I don't like bark much in my environs because the wettness here and the humidity seems to produce alot of fungus on bark, and that's something I don't need. These leaves however break down quicker and are available year round.

    The tin structure is both a wind and a sun break, but works well as a raised bed as well.
    It also saves maples in my yard from rabbits, dogs and all sorts of little vermin from chewing it. As you can see I take advantage of it to train my plant into a more upright
    form.
     

Share This Page