Baking Soda for Moss Removal

Discussion in 'Garden Pest Management and Identification' started by jykmoy, Sep 26, 2008.

  1. jykmoy

    jykmoy Member

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    I am new on these forums, so am not sure if this has been said already. I've had neighbors tell me to get a large box of Baking Soda (Arm & Hammer) at Costco and just sprinkle them on top of the moss on my roof. Has anyone had experience with this? They told me it will get rid of my moss.
     
  2. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Is there any way you could get more sunlight onto your roof? This would discourage the moss. You might try dislodging it by power-washing. Baking soda might work, but I think that dissolving it in water and soaking the moss might be more effective than sprinkling the soda on top of it.
     
  3. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    a bleach/water solution would probably be better than the baking soda. and, of course, full sunlight (with or without the bleach) will help get it under control.
     
  4. jykmoy

    jykmoy Member

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    Thanks for your replies. Interestingly enough, the part of the roof with the moss faces north and does not get much sun. There is no problem with moss on the sides facing the sun!!!

    On another note: I have moss growing on the aisles in certain sections of my vineyard. Is there an effective way of getting rid of the moss there? (without killing the grape vines?)
     
  5. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    i was going to mention north-facing as being the issue. not much you can really do about it. even a bleach treatment won't do much good. for the roof or for the highly shaded areas in the vineyard.
     
  6. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    In my "day-job" as a roofing contractor, this subject comes up constantly.

    Our favorite solution, also from Costco if you prefer, is to sprinkle the cheapest possible laundry detergent powder on your roof moss. Some guys swear by the "lemon-scented" detergent believing the citrus also has some control abilities. Applying on a drizzly day seems logical, as a real prolonged heavy rain could wash away much of the "soap" before it has contacted the moss for very long. Be very careful about walking where you've already sprinkled...the detergent makes the roof slippery.

    Bleach works, but isn't approved under your shingle warranty...the oxidation could be shortening the life of your roof, I'm not sure.

    Power washing is generally a no-no, if you start removing the granules from your shingles along with the moss, you've definitely accelerated the aging of the roof. Done carefully, with the least pressure that still works, and on as much angle as possible to avoid blasting the shingles, it could be okay. Moss comes off way easier when it's already wet, really hangs on when dry.

    I'd be kinda happy to have moss on the pathways in my vineyard, not the most noxious weed to have around. True enough tho, it may signal some kind of nutrient imbalance/deficiency. Have you had your vineyard soil tested, esp. for trace elements including iron, zinc, copper? Hopefully the drainage is good... poorly drained areas like my very rough "country style" lawn on the back of our acre with standing water in winter grows tons of moss. A poorly drained vineyard would be very problematic, so I expect you've avoided that...it just popped into my mind when thinking "moss"...

    Good luck with it,

    Glen
     
  7. jykmoy

    jykmoy Member

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    Thanks Glen, for your reply. That was helpful.

    The moss in the vineyard varies and is confined to certain locations. Normally, our climate is dry in June, July and August, so it might be due to too much water from my irrigation system. The nutrient problem is something am looking into as the grapes tell me where the needs are! They simply will not flourish when there are deficiencies, so the problems are specific and confined to specific sections along a given row.
     
  8. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Soil testing is a good idea. Moss likes an acid environment.
     
  9. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    ...fertilizer, water & shade from the grape vines...sounds like moss heaven to me. What's wrong with moss? Is it bad for your vines in some way? What pH do grapevines prefer, I seem to recall that they prefer neutral to slighlty alkaline? In this case, the cultural practises you employ might need to be reviewed, since the moss probably wouldn't grow with a lower pH. How about airflow? Do your vines runs with or at right angles to the prevailing air-drainage or wind? Lowering the humidity might help.

    Sorry to be terse (& grumpy), but I find myself sticking-up for bryophytes on a regular basis. There must be some societal prejudices & cultural history in North America that I am not aware of. Can anyone enlighten me?

    I LIKE moss in all the cracks, corners & shady spots. Looks pretty, doesn't have to be mowed & beats most of the alternatives. I encourage it, fertilize it, transplant it & check out which species do best in which conditions. A harmless, if slightly politically incorrect bit of garden-making it seems.

    BREAK THE CHLOROPHYLL CEILING - END BRYOPHYTE DISCRIMINATION NOW!

    I hope I live long enought to see a bryophyte in the White House (oops...sorry...I am a Canadian - in Ottawa then)!

    gb
     
  10. jykmoy

    jykmoy Member

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    Yes. I think I'll do a soil test. Certain sections in the vineyard also have "cracks" on the ground, so am not sure what that's due to. Too much water, not enough water, not enough organic material, etc. ? Pinot Gris are doing very well; Pinot Noirs are not doing well. So I'm not sure what to do! Help!

    It could be a circulation of air problem, though we get enough wind. A part of the vineyard sits on the lowlands and slopes uphill. Rows and Aisles sits in a norh/south direction. Wind is mostly from the south on our island. If its a shortage of sunlight problem there isn't much I can do about that because of tall fir trees on both sides of my property. I think it gets enough wind.
     
  11. nic

    nic Active Member 10 Years

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    I like moss in nooks and crannies too, particularly the velvety ones. I think they're aesthetically pleasing and interesting botanically, although I know very little about them. I've got them on rocks, and in the top of a low garden wall.
    I'm not so keen on the sphagnum type that enjoys the same conditions as hardy Geraniums though. I'm told it's a valuable addition to the compost heap, is this true?
     
  12. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    Sphagnum species are mainly bog & fen species. You need to get your camera on "macro" take some good close-ups. You might be able to lure one of the elusive moss-mavens into giving a ID. I only know a handful of species (missing a finger or two maybe), mainly from my garden. Moss is great in my compost, I suspect the spores may survive the process & it pops up all over...or I have reached critical moss in my backyard & there is an explosion of spores & fragments of the stuff all over.

    Nice to know I'm not alone. Moss, ferns & epiphytes are some of the plants I most like to see in the Pacific Northwest.

    gb
     
  13. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Glass brain, I agree with you: a bryophyte would be a welcome sight in the White House. Sure would be a vast upward leap from the current myxomycete.
     
  14. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

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    Ow!

    Just what do you have against Myxomycetes, anyway? Fine things.

    gb
     
  15. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    Yeah, as I wrote that I thought: What an insult to true slime molds everywhere. But...are they really presidential material? I was thinking more of a dangerous mutation, such as in "Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind", that engulfs entire cities. Countries, even. ---Fuligo septica, perhaps.

    Hey, gb---speaking of slime mold: take a look at the "Grapes and Grape Vines" forum, entry by Ronald Griner, ("Grapevine Fungus?") and entry by TCOLVIN ("Strange Stuff"). Could these descriptions be of some kinda plasmodial slime-mold action?
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2008
  16. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Right-o -- we don't do politics here. At least not the kind that involves specific politicians. Keep the discussion to plants, please.

    There are enough other places on the web where people can discuss politics.
     
  17. jykmoy

    jykmoy Member

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    togata57: thanks for alerting me to the Grapes forum. Am new here! I'll check them out.
     
  18. C8luvs2gardn

    C8luvs2gardn Active Member

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    GB also wrote: "I have reached critical moss: :o)))) am I the only one who caught that?

    I agree, what's wrong with moss? (I have been trying to grow in my back yard for 5 years with no success). Will it cause damage to the roof shingles? If so, and you really need to get rid of it, what about trying the vinegar solution? There is a thread on this forum about vinegar (I'm sorry I don't know how to make a link to that thread).

    Vinegar is an effective weed killer when sprayed on the leaves. It needs sunlight: vinegar + sunlight causes a reaction which will kill the leaves. When sprayed on dandelions or other weeds may take a couple of treatments but eventually the root will die as well. with the (not sure how shady your roof is, but on a sunny day even in the shade it might work). Basically a spray bottle with vinegar (pickling vinegar is best as it is a 7% solution, regular vinegar is about 5%). Put it in a spray bottle with a few drops of dishwashing liquid (makes a type of surfectant) and spray liberally.

    I wouldn't use it in the vineyard if the moss is in close proximity to the grapes, but if it is some distance and not a windy day maybe. If it is in the paths between the rows, why not leave it - will it not help to keep the weeds down?

    good luck
    Cate
     

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