In The Garden: Are these Wild Magnolia Seedlings?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Yo_Jo, Jul 5, 2017.

  1. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    I live in Vancouver and there was an beautiful grand old Magnolia tree next door. The house was torn down last year and I wanted to know if these were the seedlings from that tree. I have about 8 or 9 of them sprouting up on the corner of my house near where the branches crossed my property. That Magnolia tree use to bloom wondrous large flowers and I am thinking about potting them and replanting them in a different spot next year when all the construction is finished on that side of the property line.

    These seedlings are about a month or two old and started to show up after the snow, rain and cold spell we had this year.

    Regards

    Jo

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  2. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Sorry, definitely not magnolia, which have simple leaves, and these are compound leaves with many leaflets. I promised to not do IDs when all I have with me is a phone, but these look like Sumac to me.
     
  3. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    Thanks Wendy, I think you are right. I just need to figure out the type.
    I thought they were Magnolia's because when they flower they have these elongated antique white/purplish pedals that surround the cone of berries.

    I was looking at some websites on Sumac's - now I'm worried - are these poison Sumac's? Red stems?
     
  4. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Contributor 10 Years

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  5. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    Thanks Silver Surfer for the ID. I am glad it's not the the poisonous type.

    "Tiny, greenish-yellow flowers bloom in terminal cone-shaped panicles in late spring to early summer (June-July), with male and female flower cones primarily occurring on separate plants (dioecious)."

    Two things come to mind when reading the description and thinking back on the tree that was on that property -

    1:) I am going to have dig for some old pictures of it I remember the flower pedals were a swirl of white, pinkish, purplish hue that surrounds the red berry panicles. Do those colours change depending on its geographic location?
    2:) There was only one tree in the property (are their some Sumacs that do not take two to tango?)
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: 1, I suspect you are remembering a different plant (though it may have been growing or on the other)

    Re: 2, sumacs will happily propagate themselves via underground stems and pop up all over.
     
  7. Yo_Jo

    Yo_Jo Active Member

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    You are right there was a wall of green trees plants and shrubs on that side of the house.
     

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