Arbutus: Arbutus same as madrone?

Discussion in 'Ericaceae (rhododendrons, arbutus, etc.)' started by Daniel Mosquin, Sep 29, 2003.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The following was received via email:

    Could you tell me if arbutus trees are the same trees as the madrone (found in california) or are they related?
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes, the plant Arbutus menziesii is known commonly as arbutus, Pacific madrone and madrona.

    In Canada, I tend to hear either arbutus or madrone. While in Seattle a few weekends ago, my friend persisted in calling it madrona. Interesting regional differences.
     
  3. Myka

    Myka Member

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    I have been told that Arbutus are only found near the coast because they need the salt in the air to survive. Is this true or will one grow in my home?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The fact that arbutus grows near saltwater in our part of the world is independent of the air near saltwater being salty. Arbutus trees do not need salt air to survive.

    Their distribution in our local area is limited by two factors:

    1) A mild climate (hence, near the ocean where there is the least amount of frost due to the moderating effects of the ocean)

    2) Excellent drainage - rocky outcrops with poor soil formation are found most often near the sea in areas of mild climate

    Source: The Decline of the Pacific Madrone: Current Theory and Research (A.B. Adams, ed. C.W. Hamilton, assoc. ed. 1999, available from the Center for Urban Horticulture.

    I haven't been able to find any information on growing it as an indoor plant.
     
  5. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I have grown it in greenhouse conditions for a couple of years. I had them in tall 5 gallon pots from California, transplanted them into 7 gallon pots and kept them in an unheated greenhouse with automatic irrigation. They seemed to do just fine. I find they are a tough transplanter if the soil composition is not just right, as Daniel mentioned it seems to be the drainage that is most important. Mild temps are also good.
     
  6. westgatea

    westgatea Active Member

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    arbutus transplanting

    I have got 2 arbutus doing well, after transplanting. However, the major difficulty with these seems to be that if there is the slightest damage to the roots, they will expire. I think it makes the tissue fungus accessible.
     

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