Arbutus: Arbutus Menziesii seed hunting

Discussion in 'Ericaceae (rhododendrons, arbutus, etc.)' started by jstu, Sep 10, 2006.

  1. jstu

    jstu Member

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    Hi everyone I am new here--great forum!

    I am looking for some good healthy thickets of Arbutus in the Greater Vancouver area and some generalized tips on seed harvesting, eg, what time of year and color.

    My goal is to take seed from natural stock, propagate them over winter, and begin transplantation after first frost on some rocky exposed slopes on the North Shore. I'd like to find some good specimens that thrive in our conditions. My goal of course it to re-introduce the species to areas of its traditional range. Because we're at the edge of this tree's habitat, I'd rather use proven seed stock from Vancouver settlement survivors than something commercial or from a nursery.

    Does anyone know where a successful thicket is in easy drive / walk range? I don't have a GPS yet. I would also draw seed from a city park tree. I don't need many, perhaps just a few handfuls.

    Best regards to all,

    J Stu
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2013
  2. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    It'll be a while yet before seeds/berries are ready to be harvested. I usually wait until Late Oct or early November. I have tons of them every year on my trees and they're quite prolific in my area. If you can't get any locally, I could send you some via mail.

    Cheers, LPN (Vancouver Island)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2013
  3. jstu

    jstu Member

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    Thanks LPN, I may take you up on that offer. What propagation techniques are you using?

    Thanks, J
     
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  4. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I've allowed the berries to stay on their clusters after picking. I remove the seeds in late winter and plant in native soil in peat pots (so they can be directly planted). I leave them in my unheated greenhouse until they sprout and reach several inches in height. I then plant them out. I put a wire cage around them to keep deer or rabbits from munching on them.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
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  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not to detract from LPN's kind offer, but you are right in thinking "the more local, the better" when it comes to doing ecological restoration work (and it sounds like you've done the research re: pre-industrial ranges). Based off memory (which might be wrong), there are quite a few articles about using local genetic stock in Native Plants Journal

    Heh, I just stumbled across this article while seeing if my memory served me correctly: Cold Stratification of Pacific Madrone Seeds

    Ah, here's one article: Using local seeds in prairie restoration -- data support the paradigm

    All that being said, I don't know of a seed source that is local to the North Shore. You might want to try tapping the Native Plant Society of BC Email Listserv for an answer or the name of someone to contact.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2013
  6. jstu

    jstu Member

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    Thanks Dan, I have checked out your resources and they are excellent.

    If you have the time, could you take a look at this thread?

    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=18851

    I'm trying to do the same with some Western Reds but actually haven't found any germination resources.

    Best regards,

    J Stu
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2013
  7. Alison

    Alison Active Member

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    Hi there-
    I have an Arbutus and live in East Vancouver. There are tons of berries on the lower branches that you are welcome to, but right now they are green.
    Alison
     
  8. Michael Zinck

    Michael Zinck Active Member

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    Daniel

    Thank you for the information, I just read, and downloaded the article on 'Cold Stratification of Pacific Madrone Seeds' It will be very useful in helping me to start my Arbutus seeds next spring, along with the other information posted in this thread.

    Michael
     
  9. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I planted quite a few seeds that I collected last year. I just left the pots outside to stratify naturally. (I protected them from freezing.) They germinated well. I was excited, one of them even had three cotyledons, but they all died shortly after I transplanted them. I will try some more this year, but I will plant the seeds where I want them to grow and protect them from drying out or other extreme conditions.
     
  10. rkhosla

    rkhosla Member

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    There are lots of Arbutus trees on Bowen Island where I live. Closer to Vancouver, Lighthouse park, Whitecliff Park, and Eagle Bluffs (where the new highway is being blasted through above Horseshoe Bay) are also full of native Arbutus trees.

    I am also interested in trying to sprout some seedlings. Is it necessary to remove the seeds from the fruit?? I just picked a handful of berries and put them in the fridge - I was hoping to plant them indoors in a month or two.

    If it is preferable to separate the seeds, how is this best accomplished??

    Any advice greatly appreciated.

    Rahul

    ps - planted an Arbutus at a very wet residence in North Vancouver from a seedling bought at Southlands Nursery about 8 years ago - not sure of the exact species but looks just like the native tree. It, despite probably being significantly over watered, is thriving after a few slow years and is about 10 feet tall.
     
  11. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years

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    The UBC plant sale had baby madrone a few years ago. I am hoping they still do when I go there on Mother's Day. The baby I planted 3 years ago is doing well, about 10" high now. It was barely more than 2" when I planted it, a real baby.
     
  12. Michael Zinck

    Michael Zinck Active Member

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    Arbutus Menziesii seed/sampling hunting

    Group

    Does anyone know of nurseries which will ship small Arbutus samplings? Western Wilson offered a couple of suggestions but I don't know if the UBC Native Plant sale will ship or it is just point of sale.

    I have planted the remainder of my arbutus seed but so far none have taken. You can reach me through this forum via private message/email or directly at mszinck@eastlink.ca.

    Thanks, Michael
     
  13. WesternWilson

    WesternWilson Active Member 10 Years

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