Any idea what this deciduous terrestrial might be?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by daemonic, Sep 15, 2006.

  1. daemonic

    daemonic Member

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    Hello folks,
    I have a plant growing in my garden that I wish to identify.
    It is deciduous disappearing for some time and then reappearing.

    The leaves borne on long thin stems are green with splotches of white:

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/daemondamian/Orchids/Unidentifiedplantleaf.jpg

    The flowers borne on long thin stems have a pitcher plant appearance with the majority of it being white with green stripes but at the top it turns brown/maroon and folds over forming a sort of hood wth a point at the front.

    Additionally a spathe[?] protrudes out from underneath the hood hanging at the front:

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/daemondamian/Orchids/Unidentifiedplant6.jpg

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/daemondamian/Orchids/Unidentifiedplant5.jpg

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/daemondamian/Orchids/Unidentifiedplant1.jpg

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b253/daemondamian/Orchids/Unidentifiedplant3.jpg

    It does remind me of some Australian native terrestrial orchids but the spathe suggests otherwise. Any ideas?
    thanks :o)
    Damian
     
  2. Rima

    Rima Active Member

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    Sure looks like an orchid to me (even if leaves are different).
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Probably an Arisaema or other close relative (family Araceae)
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Arum family (Araceae). Doubt any orchids have sagittate leaves. There are some that have spathelike parts (Masdevallia, for instance) but an orchid would not have a spadix.
     
  5. tipularia

    tipularia Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  6. daemonic

    daemonic Member

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    Arisarum Vulgare - Friar's Cowl

    Hi everybody and thanks for your replies! :o)

    I checked out every plant listed at http://www.aroid.org/genera/arisaema/herold/ and did a google image search for Arisaema.

    While there were definitely similarities I didn't find one matching mine.

    So I did another google image search using Araceae and finally came across
    it: arisarum vulgare or common name= friars cowl.

    thanks again for your help, I couldn't posibly have identified this plant
    without it.
    Regards
    Damian.
     
  7. rhiannonnightsinger

    rhiannonnightsinger Member

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    Arisaema triphyllum, also known as Jack-in-the-pulpit. A real beautiful specimen, too!
    There are three varieties, but some scientists classify them together, and some separate them, but this is probably your flower.
     
  8. tipularia

    tipularia Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I ruled out A. triphyllum due to the exerted spadix, and by the leaves, which look briar-like on this one. A. triphyllum has just what the name implies, trified leaves, though it could have only one, but it would not look like the one in the photo. I have found Green Dragon, A. dracontium, which has an exerted spadix that extends upward, but the leaves are not like this one.
     

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