anwser requested. pindo plalms pacific NW

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by vanpindotrof, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. vanpindotrof

    vanpindotrof Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Paris, FRANCE
    I have seen pictures of pindo palms growing in Seattle, and (though not very large) in Lantzville BC, on Vancouver Island. Could they survive in Vancouver? All answers very much appreciated.
     
  2. Ian

    Ian Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sequim, Washington, USA
    I consider Butia capitata to be worth attempting in milder Pacific Northwest gardens but not reliably hardy in general even there. There is some variation in frost hardiness from one plant to the next, so at planting time you just don't know exactly what you are going to get. It's true that certain plants have persisted for years (at least since 1990) in sheltered gardens. I think more experimentation should be done with it including the selection of hardier forms and cultural controls to increase hardiness. It is quite slow growing here.
     
  3. vanpindotrof

    vanpindotrof Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Paris, FRANCE
    Thank you for replying, and for the information. One main reason I was hoping pindos could be grown here and there, esp downtown/ english bay, was to offset the preponderance of windmill palms, which have a much different shape and look. I love our windmill (chinese) palms like crrazy, but was looking for another much different-looking palm as a counterpoint the windmills, esp in high-profile locations. Is there another palm-like plant with either pinnate leaves, or maybe draceanas, cycads, that would complement the windmill, and could be grown in the Vancouver region?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,889
    Likes Received:
    626
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Windmill palm predominates because that is the one that lasts in this area. Long-lived specimens of other types not seen this far north, except where being coddled by enthusiasts. Cordyline australis is also common, because it is sold in large numbers and small, inexpensive sizes. However, in most areas north of the lower Oregon coast it is not able to retain an intact top for long enough periods to produce a fully developed crown.
     

Share This Page