Anthurium

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by campbell, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. campbell

    campbell Member

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    I got a Anthurium from my friend in last year ... and it marks as Anthurium luxurians,
    (Him can't sure what original for this plant)

    I think this is quite a difference with A. luxurians .... should be a hybrid., But it is difficult to be sure, I post a photo taken from my greenhouse, which is a new leaf and not a mature plant.
    Any comments?
     

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  2. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    It would appear your plant is Anthurium luxurians. If you are concerned about the sinus being either opened or closed, either is normal. Take a look at Dr. Croat's black and white photos for an example. I am including the entire scientific description by Dr. Tom Croat and Rick Cirino on the species as well as photos I have taken of the species and one that appeared in Aroideana Volume 25.

    Natural variation and ontogeney may keep the plant from being an exact match to any photo

    Steve

    Description:


    Anthurlum luxurlans Croat & Cirino,
    sp. nov. Type: COLOMBIA. Exact locality unknown, cultivated plant from material collected by George Wagner of Miami and distributed by Ervin Wurthmann of Tampa, cultivated at Silver Chrome Nurseries, Homestead, Florida by Denis Rotolante, T. B. Croat 94069 (holotype, MO; isotypes, B, COL, K, US). Figure 2.

    Planta terrestris; caudex brevia; internodia brevia, 1.5-4 cm diam.; cataphylla decidua; petiolus 25-89 cm longus; lamina ovata vel anguste ovata, 25-75 cm longa, 15-50 cm lata, pagina superior lustrosa, bullatus; spatha reflexus, ad 12.5 cm longa, et 5.7 cm lata, anguste ovata, alba velcremeus; spadix viridis, luteus per anthesin, ad 19 cm longus.

    Terrestrial; stems short and stout; internodes short, 1.5-4 cm diam., medium green, tinged weakly with red; cataphylls heavily tinged reddish brown, rounded at apex with free-ending apex, weathering to fibers then deciduous. LEAVES usually moderately few, clustered at apex of stem but not closely arranged; petioles erectspreading, 25-89 cm long, 0.75-1.5 cm diam., terete and 7-9 ribbed circumferentially, the ribs moderately wavy, especially on midrib, continuous with midrib and posterior rib on lower blade surface; blades mostly pendent, ovate to narrowly ovate, 25-6.5 cm long, 15-50 cm wide, broadest at petiole attachment or slightly distil to petiole attachment, acute to acuminate at apex, prominently lobed at base, coriaceous, conspicuously bullate; margin straight, revolute; anterior lobe to 46 cm long; posterior lobes narrowly rounded to slightly longer than broad, directed toward the base, broadly rounded on outer margin all the way to the middle of the blade, the surface flat or turned up only slightly at an angle to the midrib; sinus spathulate to narrowly V-shaped, sometimes narrowly hippocrepiform, 5-19 cm deep, 2.5-7 cm wide; major veins acute and in valleys on upper surface, acute on lower surface; midrib prominently ribbed on lower surface; primary lateral veins 5-10 per side, departing midrib at 35°-60° angle, weakly arcuate toward apex, usually joining a collective vein distant from the margins, smooth and glabrous, never scaly; collective veins usually arising from the uppermost basal veins, or in larger blades from the 1st and 2nd basal veins or even from the posterior rib; basal veins 5-7 on each side, 1st to 2nd or 3rd pairs free to the petiole, the remaining 3-5 pair coalesced 4-9 cm; upper surface dark green and glossy; lower surface much paler, epunctate.

    INFLORESCENCE erect, held slightly above the leaves; peduncle 8-29 cm long, 1,2-% as long as petioles; spathe reflexed, 6.5-12.5(19) cm long, 3-5.7(10.50 cm wide, narrowly ovate, acuminate, cordate at base, somewhat wavy on margins, obliquely attached to petiole, white to cream with greenish veins abaxially; spadix green, turning yellow at anthesis, 6.5-21 cm long, briefly stipitate, weakly tapering to apex, narrowly rounded at apex. INFRUCTESCENCE with berries red to purple, 5-7 mm long. Anthurium luxurians is assumed to be endemic to Colombia though its exact location is unknown. It is likely that the species occurs on the western slopes of the Cordillera Occidental since this is the region where two other closely related cogenera occur (see below). Indeed collections that may be the same species have been collected in Valle Department between Loboquerrero and Cisneros by Colombian horticulturist Marta Posada (Medellin) along the humid arroyos of the otherwise dry western slopes of the Cordillera Occidental. If these collections prove to be A. luxurians it would explain the much greater success in the cultivation of A. luxurians than A. splendidum which is very difficult to grow except in a mist house. The Posada living collection was not vouchered, but photos show it to be rather different in venation pattern with two pairs of basal veins in deep valleys and extending all the way to the apex of the blade, and also with the primary lateral veins not at all apparent. In contrast, typical material of A. luxurians has the basal veins more broadly arching and joining into a single collective vein that extends to the apex and also has 3-6 distinct primary lateral veins. The Posada collection may prove to a sibling species of A. luxurians since all of the existing cultivated material of A. luxurians may be from a single introduction. Future collections may prove that the species is more variable and thus might prove the collection from the western slope of Valle Department to be conspechic with A. luxurians. The species is characterized by its short, thick stem, short internodes, sharply winged-ridged petioles, conspicuously bullate glossy blades as well as by the whitish narrowly ovate-cordate spathe and yellow, briefly tapered spadix. It differs from A. splendidum (a species with which it has long been confused) in having bullate, more coriaceous glossy blades rather than relatively much thinner, deeply rugose, subvelvety and matte leaves. The growth requirements of the two species are radically different, with A. luxurians capable of being grown under a wide variety of humid conditions. In contrast, A. splendidum will survive only under conditions of very high humidity such as in an enclosed mist house. The species has long gone by the name A. splendidum Hort. owing to its strong resemblance to that species, but in recent years several wild collected plants from the region have provided new and important insights into this species and its closely related co-genera described in this paper. Anthurium luxurians has been in cultivation for about 30 years in the area of South Florida and for a lesser period of time elsewhere in the United States. It was originally collected in Colombia by George Wagner of Orlando, Florida and
    was later distributed by Ervin Wurthmann of Velva Dean's Tropicals in Tampa.

    Anthurium luxurians is one of the most attractive of ornamental plants in the family (hence the name "luxurians" meaning luxuriant).
     

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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2010
  3. campbell

    campbell Member

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    Thank you, Steve
    I am attaching more pictures may help to identify, because the source collect of A. luxurians seems very simple, did not even wild collect data for this species,
    Therefore, I guess...even if there are different clone circulating in the market, should be very close to appearance, but my clone is clearly not with the other clone...
    Incidentally, it is sometimes not four-square in petiol , but are U-shaped (only two acute angle).

    Cheers!
    campbell
     

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  4. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    The majority of clones in circulation have been grown from tissue cultured material so it is certainly possible someone crossed the plant with another species along the way. Only once have I ever seen a wild collected plant.

    As you read, Dr. Croat and Rick described the sinus as either spathulate (shaped roughly like a spathe) to narrowly V-shaped (as it appears in your plant), or sometimes narrowly hippocrepiform (shaped like a horse shoe). The petiole should normally be terete (round) or winged. Your petioles certainly do appear to have a sulcus or be canaliculate (possessing a canal, or C shaped). However, in some instances this shape can also be closely related to terete. In this case, it may be that your petioles are simply demonstrating more of a "wing" but that would be up to a qualified aroid botanist to determine.

    Otherwise, if your plant is a hybrid I can only think of one plant with which it may have been crossed and that would be one commonly known as as Anthurium splendidum. As far as I can tell from the photo of your inflorescence it is certainly within the realm of variation for the species. To me, it appears to be an acceptable variation for the species unless you can point out some specific reason why it does not match the description.

    Steve
     
  5. campbell

    campbell Member

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    for the Anthurium splendens ... your mean should be A. splendidum?

    In fact ... I suspect it is a hybrid....based on a important reason -
    it is very likely to come from Southeast Asia, and this is a very confusing area of plant names
    I have seen many tags for the Anth. species and subsequently proved to be a hybrid ... so I very much doubt it, and I do work in research institutions and My office has some equipment, if necessary, we may make a examination.

    Perhaps the picture could be misleading, but for the plant of picture, the blade surface is 'fog' and not glossy blades, maybe we need more observations...

    campbell
     
  6. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I thought I did say spendidum. It also resembles a hybrid known as Anthurium radicans x Anthurium dressleri. The principal difference I see is the positioning of he collective vein. If it is a hybrid the only way to be certain would be a DNA test which is very costly.

    Steve
     

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  7. campbell

    campbell Member

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    In fact, I've seen Anthurium radicans x Anthurium dressleri, it doesn't similar my plant, I know that hybrid are very common in Southeast Asia, if my plant is a hybrids, I think it should include A. luxurians parents.
    I have had seen a picture from web for the A. luxurians, this clone seem more similar my plant than the tissue culture clone, that the link following:
    http://www.anthurium-species-holy.ic.cz/?page_id=349

    If there is a more detailed morphological data for A. luxurians, we can very easily tell the difference between the different clone, of course, they may not be the same ...
    But "species" is defined as man-made, how much a species should be tolerant of variation? These are the "human definition" and do not necessarily have a natural and clear boundaries
    If I want to confirm my A. luxurians, first of all, I may need to collect many different wild clone for the real A. luxurians, for DNA sequencing, data can be carried out until the next step ...
    But first ... "collection different wild clone for the A. luxurians" is a difficult task (even if I went to Colombia, still needs a lot of luck ...)
    collected the specimens from South America myself is almost impossible to achieve now
    (Sorry for my bad English.)

    Therefore, it is more practical approach is to investigate the source, and made for differences in anatomy ... this is what we are can do now.
     
  8. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Not sure where you found the defintion of "species but technically the definition is "A group of individual organisms, which have a common characteristic, distinction or quality separating them, from other groups. All of the species with a certain number of characters in common are grouped as a genus." Although a species is determined by a human it generally goes through a lengthy process including a peer review and must be published in a recognized journal before it becomes and official name. I am aware of quite a few "species" that have yet to be published despite the fact they are commonly collected plants. Dr. Croat has at least 500 plants in the Missouri Botanical Garden aroid collection that currently have only a number and are yet to be officially named.

    Hybrids are generally man made although Nature does produce a number of natural hybrids in the wild The definition is "Plant offspring resulting from the cross-pollination between parents of different species or sub-species."

    It sounds to me as if you are on the right track to learning what you are truly growing but don't be surprised if many wild collected plants show somewhat differing characteristics.

    You can find more scientific definitions on my site here: http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Botanical terminology.html
     
  9. campbell

    campbell Member

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    In fact .... I have had involved published of new species, ... so I can understand this process,
    However, a species in nature is not necessarily a "rigorous" distinction with other types of ...
    You can refer to a noun: Continuous Variation
    Or "Complex",
    for a species, maybe a great variation tolerant, may also be a very narrow definition, in a premise, different researchers have different views.
    so...the plant systematics is never stops.
     

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