Another suspicious character

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Ken R, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    The opposite-leaved shurb in the pictures is growing in the same out-of-control bed that had the Elaeagnus, subject of an earlier thread.

    I suspect it is another volunteer. Can anyone identify it?

    - Ken
     

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I think it's a honeysuckle, Lonicera - possibly one of the invasive ones?
     
  3. jerebox

    jerebox Member

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    Hi,
    could it be a Philadelphus?
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I thought maybe Philadelphus too, or maybe Callicarpa or maybe...?? Ken, did you see any flowers or other identifying features?
     
  5. Ken R

    Ken R Active Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions, all.

    I don't have any fruits or flowers.

    Still, the sugestions pointed me in some good directions. I dug out W.C. Muenscher's "Keys to Woody Plants," a little pocket guide to keying species native or commonly escaped in the woods of the NE US, copyright 1950. It's not a very good resource for garden plants, but it happens to cover plants in the three genera mentioned.

    The key notes that native Philadelphus shrubs have their buds hidden underneath the base of the petioles or imbedded under the leaf scars in the winter twigs. Callicarpa americana has naked buds, or sometimes buds nearly covered by a pair of scales.

    This fellow has buds with multiple scales, covered in hairs and easily seen above the base of the petioles. If you care about such things, the leaf scars show three bundle scars. The bark of the twigs is grey-brown, the wood is greenish, and there is a brownish pith.

    I keep coming back to Daniel's call: it seems to be one of the invasive bush honeysuckles, but I can't figure out which one. If I let it stay until spring and bloom, I'll have more clues. I will also be giving it a chance to really establish itself.

    I think it has to go.

    Any further ideas on keying honeysuckles would be welcome, though. I'm still curious to know its full name.
     

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