Another Flower Identification

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by lkliewer, May 19, 2004.

  1. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Kelowna, BC
    Need help identifying flower

    I would appreciate some more help with this flower taken near the lake in Kelowna -- semi-marsh area although I have seen them growing in dry spots along the road as well.

    Thanks...
     

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    Last edited: May 20, 2004
  2. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Kelowna, BC
    I don't think it's the same (Close though)

    I will take some more pictures of it today on my walk if it is still there -- it wasn't a vine-like plant and was growing very low to the ground. The flower was almost flat not like a morning-glory....

    Thanks for the input...
     
  3. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Black Ceek, B.C., Canada
    Given your location, it might be Convolvulus arvensis or perhaps C. nyctagineus
     
  4. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Hi Chris:

    This plant in question could very well be Convolvulus arvensis
    but I am not positive about that based on the two flower URLs
    below.

    Generally for us, there is no pink coloring in the throat for our
    field bindweed here. There is in many flowers a purplish-pink
    stripe and muted coloration on the backside of the petals on
    many of our plants flowers as shown in the Flower 2 URL.

    Overview

    http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7462.html

    Flower 1

    http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/C/W-CV-CARV-FL.003.html

    Flower 2

    http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/C/W-CV-CARV-FL.006.html

    For this thread below is a URL of the pink flowered form I've seen
    used as a ground cover. There is some doubt that it may indeed be
    a form of Ipomoea.

    http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?t=2636

    http://www.cedarcreek.umn.edu/plants/newslides/11748.jpg

    Jim
     
  5. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Kelowna, BC
    Bindweed

    You are right, I found some Field Bindweeds near where I had taken the picture but the original flower was gone. I have attached a photo of these. I will have to go back and see if I can find the actual plant and get a picture of the leaves....
     

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  6. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Hi Lkliewer:

    Please do go back and find the original plant and tell me if it is
    more of a clump rather than a spreading type plant. Who would
    have thought that field bindweed comes in more than one form
    but it does. The same is true for wild morning glory. There is
    a blue form of wild morning glory that is not an Ipomoea, just
    like the pink form I referenced in the last post is technically
    classed as being a Convolvulus. Obviously, people through the
    years have lumped the various forms of field bindweed and
    morning glory together for rather simplistic purposes but not
    all the forms are invasive from what I've seen of them.

    Excellent job of asking what should have been a reasonable
    question but the answer is not that simple at all! Well done!

    Jim
     
  7. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Kelowna, BC
    Finally the leaves....

    I finally got to the location and took some pictures of the leaves. It is definitely a bindweed. I found it interesting that there were three distinct colorations on the flowers -- some were pink edged, some where completely white, and these had the purple spots in the center. They were all on separate vines or plants...
     

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