Another challenge for me ...

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by lkliewer, Jun 11, 2004.

  1. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Kelowna, BC
    Another flower that I can't seem to pin down for sure -- have looked at agoseris aurantiaca whose blossom is similar but the leaves are not hairy... Here is the blossom and a picture of the leaves. (I am starting to realize how little I know about identifying plants -- the ratio of ones I identify myself is going up slowly)
     

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  2. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Just a quick note.

    < I am starting to realize how little I know about identifying plants. >

    The same kind of thing happens to all of us. I saw a non-native plant
    at the Valley of Fire and took a pic of it. At first I thought, no problem
    it is a form of Phacelia but what caught my eye was that the flowers
    had yellow centers and the leaves were entirely different than the ones
    we see around here. None of my books show this exact plant, so what
    I thought was true from what I knew and learned years ago is now a
    mystery for me.

    I've seen online White Rhatany (Krameria), also seen at the Valley
    of Fire, that shows plants with pink flowers or red, or purple flowers
    all classed as being Krameria grayi and I say to myself no, these have
    all been lumped together. In the wild the pink flowered form and the
    purple flowered form are quite a bit different in how the sepals are
    reflexed in comparison to one another. The purple form that we
    saw had no flowers (sepals) reflexed at all.

    The beauty about wildflowers is that as soon as we think we know
    something we get thrown a "curve" that many times takes us back
    to square one.

    Don't think you are wasting our time as you most certainly are
    not. You've caught me off guard more than once with some of
    your ID posts. What you are doing is exactly what should be
    done to better learn the plants your are seeing in the wild.

    Jim
     
  3. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  4. hungry hippo

    hungry hippo Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi there,
    That's an interesting one. The flower certainly looks like Agoseris, but the leaves look more like Hieracium. Isn't it amazing that no matter where you travel in the world, there are literally hundreds of different small yellow wildflowers begging to be identified. I think you could probably make a life's work out of studying diminutive yellow weeds!
     
  5. lkliewer

    lkliewer Active Member 10 Years

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    Yellow flowers

    Thanks Mr. Shep and Hungry Hippo -- I've noticed how conditions can vary the looks of the plant considerably -- lots of rain and you seem to get fuller bigger leaves. This agoseris was taken in a moister area under some trees so maybe the leaves are broader??

    You are right about life-time identifying yellow flowers -- Everywhere I go I see another variety or subtle variation. Maybe I will find an Agoseris lkliewerlata....
     

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