Annual peppers?

Discussion in 'Fruit and Vegetable Gardening' started by lavalos, Apr 20, 2009.

  1. lavalos

    lavalos Active Member

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    Location:
    Omaha, Nebraska, US
    Last year we grew pepper on a container, and right before the first frost, my wife decided to move it inside, in spite of knowing that peppers are annuals. The plant overwintered in our basement and started loosing the leaves. Know the plant was moved back to the first floor, and leaves are starting to grow! Mi question is: would this plant produce peppers again, or I'd better replace it with new seedlings?
     
  2. monkeydog

    monkeydog Active Member

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    S.E. Tennessee, U.S.
    Lavalos, I don't have time to figure out how to work the link feature, but look back around page 5 or so on this forum. A thread titled "jalepeno pepper plant indoors" from last October.

    I believe that yes, you should have peppers again!
     
  3. JanR

    JanR Active Member

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    Location:
    Lakeland, Manitoba
    I don't believe that peppers are annuals. That is just the way that they are usually grown. I believe that they will keep growing.
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) do grow as perennials in tropical areas, but are usually grown as annuals. I would keep the overwintered plant for fun and experiment, but I believe that peppers usually perform and produce better when grown as annuals.
     
  5. natureman

    natureman Active Member

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    Correct JanR, Capsicum's are grown as annuals. But they in fact will grow as a perrenial if the correct conditions exist. Yes they will produce flowers and eventually fruit although sometimes it's best to start over with new plants.
     

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