An interesting teratological example of Anemone nemorosa with

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by duffy, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. duffy

    duffy Active Member

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    I came across this plant during the later part of May of this year. It was growing in the company of 30 odd similar plants in an area of approx. 16 feet square. Surrounded by Ranunculaceae: Anemone nemorosa and Anemone apennica. These flowers were growing at a quota of 3900 ft. in a very damp, shadowy and leaf covered soil. I immediately thought that it must be a hybrid between the two Anemone species. Photographs were sent to a researcher friend at the Naples Botanical Garden, I mentioned the possibility of a hybrid, the researcher accepted the hybrid theory. At the same time I sent photographs to another Botanical Garden and hybrid theory was rejected for a "Teratological " alternative. Later I returned to collect seeds but found none! I thought members might be interested in seeing the flower. Duffy
     

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  2. GreenLarry

    GreenLarry Active Member 10 Years

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    Very interesting!
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Or perhaps an escaped garden cultivar.

    The reason there's no seed is that the stamens have been replaced by the extra petals; Anemone nemorosa is primarily self-pollinating, so the absence of pollen will effectively prevent seed from forming.

    If you want to propagate it as a potential new garden cultivar, you'll need to do so vegetatively, which is very easy done by dividing the rhizomes (but make sure you have permission to dig some up).
     
  4. duffy

    duffy Active Member

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    Dear Michael F. Thank you for reply to my Thread. In this case I do not think there is any question of it being an escaped Garden cultivar. The area where I found these few plants is wild and isolated, and at a very high altitude. The Anemone nemorosa and Anemone apennica are very common in the woods at this altitude and geographical area. These plants, let me call them hybrids, were also surrounded by both other species. I find your explanation exceedingly interesting and very worthy of consideration when other cases occur. Many thanks Michael F. duffy
     

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