Identification: Amanita microlepis?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by C.Wick, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    Found in NE Kansas...not listed yet as being found here. I photographed it for 3 days before I finally dug it up and took it in to my local Myco club. The enthusiasts there believe it to be the A.microlepis. It has the distinct 'scaly' look to the stem/volva. The gills were a pale 'coffee au lai' and got a bit darker once I had it out of the ground for awhile.....I didn't see any blue color to the volva or stipe however?
    Found under Oaks, growing in EXTREMELY dry conditions. When I dug it out, I unearthed clay though...so not sure if that helped it or not. The warts on the cap are very distinct, and circling them in circular patterns, are even smaller ones.
    The images I've seen online don't show such distinctive warts or patterns...
    Does anyone have more info that might help here?
     

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  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    I love Amanita section Lepidella. Check out http://www.eticomm.net/~ret/amanita/species/microlep.html for a good page on your mushroom. Note "the only species of section Lepidella that is known to have similarly colored gills is A. pelioma Bas, which can be distinguished by the even more unusual character of having the universal veil material (at least on the stipe) bruise blue-green." so your local club seems to have been correct, and great pictures by the way.
     
  3. Frog

    Frog Rising Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Amazing cap surface!
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Here's another Lepidella - growing under mountain Mahogany. As far as we know, it doesn't have a name yet.
     

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  5. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    If I'd seen the gills first...I'd never have thought to look under the Amanita family...glad to see it DOES fit somewhere though.
    And Frog? The cap texture is my FAVORITE! Something about patterns, textures, designs just get me...reasons why the Netted Rhodotus is my most favorite mushroom in my area.
    The link you sent, MycoRob, is exactly about the only other link I DID find on this guy...lol
    What did you do with you're 3 fellows you found there? Did you notice any particular odor with them?
    ......
    Last night, I got a nose-full of a lovely stink horn species that someone brought in to the meeting...........I could smell it before it even came in the door COVERED. The Chambered Stinkhorn, or Simblum sphaerocephalum. SHEEEESH. I really would have preferred to put my face in a shoe instead.
     
  6. fish dr

    fish dr Active Member

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    Beautiful mushrooms.

    All mushrooms are edible -some only once - Eastern European proverb
     
  7. miss_myxomycete

    miss_myxomycete Active Member 10 Years

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    Wonderful photos! And what a lovely texture & colour this mushroom has..
     
  8. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    THANX! It has been confirmed as Amanita microlepis! Thanx everyone for helping add a new species to our list in Kansas!
     

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