1. Louis A

    Louis A New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Fraser Valley
    Anyone growing agave? I have a few in the garden that have done quite well including agave ovatifolia, agave ‘vanzie’, agave neomexicama, and agave parryi. I planted a small agave Montana last fall and it definitely has some rot to the lower leaves, but it’s alive. For all of the agave I have amended the soil, planted on a slight angle so that water drains away from the plant, and picked spots where the roots from nearby plants/trees hog the water. I’m just wondering other people’s experiences.
    666914AE-319F-44E2-BCB5-6A95D9702FCC.jpeg
     
  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Active Member

    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Greater Vancouver, BC Canada
    Again - impressive ! (Like your olive - other thread today)

    I take it that these are in hot side of your house (south face)

    AMEND - it’s nice farm soil land out there in the valley ... so what did you amend with and what size hole etc?

    Your sempervivum (hem & chicks look very happy too ... I am fascinated by the one I bought here at garden Center that looks like cobweb or cotton candy ... tho it seems more sensitive to cold and damp than the original ones)
     
  3. Louis A

    Louis A New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Fraser Valley
    it really depends where you are. South of highway 1 towards whatcom road is very fertile rich soil largely in part to the old lake bed from when Sumas lake was drained. However, that changes dramatically throughout the city. Where I’m at is surprisingly sandy and rocky soil. In fact, much of the standard pnw nursery trade plants die without large amounts of supplemental watering. A quick drive around neighbourhoods in the summertime reveals stressed plants.

    This could be a new norm, an age old problem that we haven’t realized until water restrictions, or just a temporary pattern, but I believe that heat tolerance is a consideration deeper into the valley one gardens. Now, I’m not suggesting agave to the average gardener, but being a fan of the desert plants, and an overall Mediterranean look, I had to try! So, despite having already great soil, much of the beds are raised with the addition of extra gravel and sand to create quick drainage.
     
    Daniel Mosquin likes this.
  4. Jay Akerley

    Jay Akerley New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Delta
    Hi Louis. I grow a number of Agave in my garden in the Sunshine Hills area of North Delta, including A. montana, A. gentryi, A. parryi etc. The A. parryi cv “JC Raulston” does particularly well. I have a large collection of hardy Agave but most live in terra cotta pots. For those in the ground, I use a lot of Sechelt Sand, a quarry product Available at Burnco that is popular among rock / alpine gardeners. I have the Agaves in that pure mineral medium in various parts of the yard. I agree with your approaches regarding slopes and under trees such as Douglas Fir which suck up a lot of water.
    I have been looking for A. ovatifolia and am growing from seed. Where on earth did you find a big one like that?
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Jay Akerley

    Jay Akerley New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Delta
    Here is A. parryi “JC Raulston” just now.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Louis A

    Louis A New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Fraser Valley
    It wasn’t always big. It’s been in ground for quite a few years. They actually grow relatively quick around here. Mine originally can’t from Phoenix perennials, I believe. Though, maple leaf has carried them in the past
     
  7. Jay Akerley

    Jay Akerley New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Delta
    Thanks! Maybe I'll give Gary at Phoenix a call.
     

Share This Page