Additions to deer proof list (zone 7/8)

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by wynn, Dec 24, 2007.

  1. wynn

    wynn Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bowen Island
    I would be interested in others' experiences with grevillea rosmarinifolia and callistemon shrubs. I have so far (3 years) found them to be 100% deer proof and good for planting at seashore level in zones 7/8. Anyone had deer eat them? I am working on expanding the list of choices for around here (Bowen Island, other island, Vancouver lower mainland).

    Wynn
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,104
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    The true test is when a hard winter comes - both for browsing and for hardiness (in the case of the shrubs you have mentioned). Hungry/starving deer less selective.
     
  3. Ian

    Ian Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sequim, Washington, USA
    I have a large collection of both genera and deer never eat them at all.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,104
    Likes Received:
    288
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Much of your work has been with specimens grown for short periods. The last significant trial was in 1990.
     
  5. janetdoyle

    janetdoyle Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria [Saanich, actually, northeast of Victoria
    I have not had deer here in Saanich eat the Osmanthus burkwoodii, the Myrtus communis, the Hypericum "Hidcote", the Ilex crenata "Fastigiata" [sky pencil holly] which I planted late in the 07 Fall -- mind you, they have only been in the ground since about late November, and I have placed some deer netting loosely over them. But the deer netting has blown aside on occasion, and something or the wind has knocked aside the netting from time to time to munch on some top leaves of a small camellia [grrr-r], although two larger camellias quite nearby never seem to be touched [why?]. I just have not had time to use the deer netting as a fence, but have loosely laid it over a few things raised up a bit on some stakes which I have sort of hooked the netting onto... I didn't put the netting on, right away, either, so I don't think the crispy leaves of the Osmanthus or the myrtle or the Sky Pencil holly really appealed to them.
     
  6. wynn

    wynn Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bowen Island
    Thanks for the feedback everyone. Janet, I've noticed the same with large, mature camellias. They are not bothered by deer. Is it the variety (older varieties less tasty?), the age (stronger tasting/tougher?) or (???). Anyone else have a theory?

    Wynn
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Courtenay, Vancouver Island
    or you could use dry garden plants, cacti, Agave, Yucca etc to keep deer from browsing. Summer flowers too with low maintanence.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. joanb

    joanb Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sunshine coast
    Spirea, and cistus are two shrubs that I have found the deer do not eat. Pine and spruce are also left alone. I have heard that if you circle your tree with something shiny (this person cut a tin pie plate in a circular fashion) the deer will not step over it. Hanging anything in your tree does not work. I have laid chicken wire on the ground around the base of a tree that I have just planted and the deer will not step on it or over it.
     
  9. janetdoyle

    janetdoyle Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria [Saanich, actually, northeast of Victoria
    Glad to hear about the spirea... I have a new "bridalwreath" spirea, planted late last fall, which has a nice shape, waiting I hope to bloom... fyi I have been bottling up human urine to use as a leaf spray against deer -- it seems to work. Easily rained off, of course. Leave some in a few spray bottles in the garage to "ripen" ... the more odoriferous the better. Doesn't damage leaves. A bit of nuisance, though, to say the least.
     

Share This Page