Addicted to Japanese Maples....

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Jan M, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. Jan M

    Jan M Member

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    Hi all, this is my 1e post to this forum, just found this website as I was looking for informations about Japanese Maples and this forum is so great.
    Since February / March 2006 I have a new house with front and backside garden...but I am / was no gardener at all. I went to some nursery's in my area and bought some plants including my 1e acer....an Acer Palmatum "Garnet" just because I wanted some "green" too. The Acer Palmatum Garnet was in a pot, I thought it would be nice to leave it in the pot and put it somewhere in my little garden in front of my house but this garden is situated to the south and gets too much sunshine a day. The plant was not too big and had some nice coloured leafes but because of the extreme heat we had this last summer all leaves went brown and were burned. Just after summer all leafes went off and I think this plant was stressed. In August my garden at the backside of the house was finally ready including the wooden fences. Around middle August I decided to put the Acer in the ground including all other plants and in the meantime I bought another Acer at a nursery, this was the Acer Palmatum "Bloodgood" which I also put in the ground but in November 1e we had a big storm and my fence blew down....and all leaf from Bloodgood were gone too.
    After built up a new fence I had to re-organize my garden as I noticed some plants were not put on right places, I also noticed I used wrong type of ground for Acer......all info found on internet. I got more and more interested in plants and especially in Japanese Acers and found some specialized websites including nursery's. In November I went to Boskoop and visited a well known nursery specialized in Acers, wow that was something, I left home including 6 new Acers, I bought Acer Palmatum Higasa Yama, Shin de Shohjoh, Asahi Zuru, Oridono Nishiki, Ueno Yama and Acer Shirasawanum "Aureum", I planted them all in peat and put some coconut-pulps on the earth, I only left the Aureum in the pot. I hope I put them on good places and the situation for all plants is OK, the ground is soil, humus and can't wait till it is spring as I want to see the new leaf myself in real....hoping "old" Garnet and Bloodgood recovered and all new ones will do fine too, so hopefully in future I can contribute here on the Maple Photo Gallery with some pictures of my plants as well.
    2 weeks ago I bought 10 piece 2nd year "wild" Acer Palmatum and 20 pieces which are 1 year old, just for fun to see I can grow them in small pots, I think they are used for graft.
    Some still have leaf, very various colourfull.
    For now thanks to all for superb info's on this forum, sometimes difficult for me to understand everything because English language is not my native language, anyway I am happy to be part of this forum now.

    Best regards from Jan
     
  2. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Welcome Jan
    I am jealous that you have had the opportunity of a personal visit to Esvelds in Boskoop
    Here's hoping all of your acers do well for you and bring you as much pleasure as mine have for me
     
  3. Jan M

    Jan M Member

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    Hi Sam, thanks for your reply and welcome word, yes you were correct I was at Esveld in Boskoop, nice rare plants for very good prices. The 1 and 2 year young "wild" Palmatum I have bought from a nursery in the North Part of The Netherlands. As was told me used for graft and inoculate or as starter material for Bonsai. When I look at Esveld website I see its called only Acer Palmatum. As explanation is written: The real Japanese maple, very changeable, can become 4 meters (should be around 13-14 feet) after 10 years. I have made 2 pictures today from one of the 2 year ones, does anybody know the real name of this Acer ? I see all Japanese Acer Palmatum have another name behind the word Palmatum.....but this one ? Or has it no name ?
    Best regards from Jan, here are the fotos:
     

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  4. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I would guess that these plants would not really be suitable as garden plants, as they would grow much too large .... they are the plant you would find in the wild. Ideal as root stock or possibly bonsai as suggested.
    Japanese maples with a 'name' after the 'Acer palmatum' title are what are known as 'cultivars' .... simply put, they have been cultivated for use as garden plants. As such they are much more suitable for use in the garden
    Esvelds sell books on the subject of japanese maples ... it might be well worth your while to buy one. Why not treat yourself for Christmas? You couldn't have a better start than J.D. Vertrees book on 'Japanese Maples'
     
  5. Jan M

    Jan M Member

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    Hi all, Sam thanks a lot for explanation about the "wild one" and cultivars, today I needed to buy some materials at the nursery......but also bought another Acer which I wanted to have as I really like that plant....I bought a small Acer Palmatum Dissectum for a very good price so I could not refuse.
    Day by day I learn more about the Acer, I have read a lot of information on this forum and because I have some rootstock here I am very interested in grafting, thanks to those who published information about grafting, the following link was very clearly to me: http://webpages.charter.net/wbshell/garden/graft1.htm
    Today I made my first 2 grafts, maybe I am just a little bit to early, maybe it is better to wait till half or end January 2007 to start but I just tried today.....I see it as a test, a little experiment, I never did grafting before in my life.
    I have grafted Acer Palmatum ‘Garnet’ and Acer Palmatum ‘Higasa yama'. Ofcaurse I have put them outside on a protected place in the garden.
    I made some fotos of the grafts when I just finished them inside the house:
    On the left Garnet, on right Higasa Yama.When I succeeded I will make fotos again from the results. Best regards from Jan
     

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  6. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    Do you have any new photo yet? I am a newbie here too. How many JMs do you have now? Which one is your favorite? and how do you do the "graft" thing? Sorry English is not my mother language either.
     
  7. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi, this is my first message in this forum and I am in a pretty similar situation than Jam M (90% of that she said it's true to me). Also English is not my native language, so please sorry (in advance) for some misspelling word or phrase. Here is my main reason to join to this forum:

    Several years ago, in one of our travels to Canada, my wife and I visited the Botanical Garden in Montreal, and I was impressed with the wonderful and beautiful Japanese Maples, and from that moment I dreamed with some day include them in my garden.
    For work reasons, we settled in Houston, TX almost 4 years ago and after 35 years living in apartments and condos (that’s mean: no gardens and just some potted plants); finally, at the end of last year, we decided to buy a house. We chosen a good size "cul de sac" lot in a new beautiful subdivision and we ordered a brand new house. So my old dream of caring my own garden as a hobby become true.
    I decided to design and built my own landscape so during the construction phase of our house, I did my homework, making an extensive research about landscaping, garden, trees and reading a lot of information in internet (and about 25 books!), some of them dedicated to Japanese Maples. The process was (and still is) a wonderful experience and opened a totally new world to me.
    So, last march when the construction finally finished and we moved in, I already had my own final drawings for the backyard landscape (with a total area of about 6500 sqf to work from “scratch” –well I must say from clay-) and I began to put the “hands on” project.
    I designed my landscape to have two different sections or areas with a different use: one for parties and outdoor activities which will include a future pool (well future due the inve$$timent factor!!), and other retired area designed more with the idea of relaxation to “rest and meditate” with a “Japanese touch” located in the North side of the house.
    It’s not easy in this area of Texas to find Japanese Maples, because usually the most nurseries offer only the most common (and adapted) plants and trees for the area; but at the same time it looks to me a little “boring” that most of the neighborhoods have more or less the same “sight” (because almost all landscapers and gardeners uses similar plants and trees). Probably I’m looking for trouble, but I like challenges; so for my backyard I considered to include some Acer Palmatums and try to grow and thrive this beauties in my garden (I’m not sure if I will succeed with them, but for sure, I know that I’m learning a lot and also I’m enjoying and getting fun with it… and probably I’ll lost some money, too). So I decide to embark in this “adventure”.
    During last winter I bought my first two small (2 gallon) JM: one was labeled as bloodgood and the other was a Viridis. (neither of them had leaves, and looked in bad shape in that time; but I got them for a good price (25$ each) and now they are doing pretty well). I need to note, that my original design contemplates to include a few 4 or 5 JM trees; but regarding Acer Palmatums I confess: I’m weak and usually I do have the habit of buying what I like if it tickles to me….
    I made my personal selection of JM that I would like to have and I began to visit (from time in time) some nurseries that usually receives JM. In that way, I found one of my favorites: the Sango Kaku or Coral bark: they had just arrived at the nursery and they were splendorous (and that without a single leave on them!), so I bought three of this cultivar. They were standard, about 3-4 ft tall, and I planted upper the clayey soil in the east and north side of the house. (I had to make some sort of “raised” beds for all my plants, using 30 cubic yards of good topsoil and 40 cubic yards of mulch!! and also I installed a good drainage system surrounding these areas). Until now, they’re thriving pretty well, and reach almost 6 ft only in these three months, but they still have ahead the two hottest months of the year, so I will prey….
    Recently, (and for fun) I bought three small Japanese Maples cultivar Acer Palmatum Atroporperum seedlings type (no grafted), and I transplanted to a bigger pots with good soil, so they’re also growing very well. I bought all these maples before the house were finished (I’m afraid that I caught some strange disease called “Acer Palmatum fever”)and I had to storage them in my small balcony for the rest of the winter…until the house was ready to move in.
    Now, I continued to increase my small collection and I reached to 23 different sizes JM. I added the following cultivars: “Waterfall” (I have two in 2 gallon size and one spectacular specimen of 5 ft tall, that cost to me a little fortune!); one “Shaina” (2 gal) 2 ft; two green Japanese maples (common), two variegated “Butterfly” 5-6 ft tall each, one “Beni hime” (4 ft tall), one “Burgundy Lace”, one Atropourperum with 3 ft tall and two “Seyru” (one 4 ft tall one 3 ft tall).
    Some of them are keeping in pots (for now) because we’re getting into the summer and this means the next two months with temperatures usually over 100. I already built a temporary area with a shade cloth and I’m keeping them well watered. Other reason to keep them in pots is because it is my first year in the house and I’m tracking the sun exposure in some spots of the garden, just to make sure where to plant them.
    I’m planning to add some more to my collection: I want the specimens Acer Palmatum Shirasawarum Aureum and Autumn Moon. I’m thinking to keep them in containers for caring purposes because I know they’re very delicate with the sun/wind exposure.

    I don’t know if some nurseries will bring this cultivars to Houston (the don’t know in advance what kind of AP are delivered to them). Also I would like to ask if somebody knows other places near Houston where I can find them, and of course I’m open to yours comments & suggestions, and hopefully I will very glad to contribute with my comments to this site and I would like in later post include some pics of my Japanese Maples. (Again sorry with my English).

    Thank you

    Nelson
     
  8. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Interesting stories Nelson
    You might like to look at my website for ideas on your 'Japanese' style garden
     
  9. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    I like your website Whis4ey, pretty nice and kungfu.

    Just like you Nelson, I think I got a "JM fever" since I have a house (1 yr ago), I have been wandering so many Nurseries nearby where I am living, surf on the Internet for more info, and have ordered them on the Web also. So far, I have my Bloodgood, Orindo Nishiki, and Beni Onishi, Korean Gem are doing pretty well. I also have Firelow, Japanese Sunrise that still in the little pot. I have 2 SangoKaku died last month due to the cold snap during May. I found that this forum is very helpful and having a lot of friendly people. If you have any pictures, please share with us.

    If we order from the Web, anyone knows what is the site to order? Thanks !
     
  10. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi Hanl,

    Yes, I already took some pictures of the JMs and soon I will post them. Actually, I have 23, some of them are in ground and some I’m keeping in pots (for now) and I'm counting on..... As I said, I would like to include in my collection the Acer Palmatum Shirasawarum Aureum and Autumn Moon.

    Jan, Did you try the "layering" technique instead of grafting?
     
  11. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi, Sam,

    I visited your website, and wow, pretty nice place you made there. For sure, I'm going to visit your website again for more info about japanese things for my garden. I don't decide yet if the garden will be a "formal" japanese as yours, but probably I would like to add some stone lanterns and make one or two spots with rocks, lanterns, a small pond and of course, the JMs; just to have at least some "feeling" of japanese style and in that way, "frame" the JMs to the garden.

    Thanks for your advice.
     
  12. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hanl,

    Well I didn't buy any of my JM using the web, becuase I like to see what I'm buying, but there are several nurseries websites here in USA: You can try to buy JM in www.mountainmaples.com, but probably they don't deliver JMs during summer so you will have to wait for them until fall.
     
  13. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Jan, Did you try the "layering" technique instead of grafting?
     
  14. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    Yes, I am currently their customer. They have so many selection, their good customer services is a plus also. But their trees are little bit pricey, cuz they are locating in California I guess. They will have a big sale beginning of July.
     
  15. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi here are a few of my Acer Palmatums.
    from left to right:
    1.- a Close up of one of the Sango Kaku (Coral Bark)
    2.- One of my A.P. Seryu
    3.- A variegated called Butterfly (far rigth, near to the window another Sango Kaku)
    4.- Other Sango Kaku located in east side of the house.
    5.- My only A.P. Viridis
     

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    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
  16. Jan M

    Jan M Member

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    Hi Hanl, sorry for delays, no I don't have any photo of the grafts anymore as I failed....it seems grafting is not so easy and probably not my thing or maybe I did not succeed because it was done in the wrong period, Hanl I have following Acer now:
    Acer Palmatum Bloodgood, AP Ueno yama, AP Higasa yama, AP Shin de Shohjoh, AP Garnet, AP Oridono Nishiki, AP Ohsakazuki, AP Katsura, AP Seiryuh, AP Dissectum, AP Asahi Zuru and Acer Shirasawanum Aureum.
    My favorite is AP Higasa Yama, I have made several photos and will upload them later at the photo section.

    Best regards from Jan
     
  17. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    Hi Nelran,
    You make me miss more my Sango Kaku. I had 2 SangoKaku that are same size with yours which have died 2 months ago. Your soil looks very good, what kind of soil are you using?
     
  18. Jan M

    Jan M Member

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    Hello Nelran, no I never tried the layering technique.....maybe next year in summer I will try to graft again, I have bought new plants, I mean young plants so I prefer not to cut them and let them grow first, so later on it is more easy to take some graft material from them.
    I bought most of them as 1 year old plants, some are growing very quickly and are healthy, 2 of them had some die back, shivering leaves and dead wood at the end of the branches, I cut all dead wood some months ago and see them producing new leaves again now.
    Congratulations for your garden and new house, hope you do fine, your house and garden looks good and nice to me, especially your Acers ofcaurse.

    Best regards from Jan
     
  19. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  20. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi Hanl,

    Well, The soil you find here in Houston are all processed and I'm not pretty sure of the mix, but I think that is mixed to use with the clay soil that ussually we have here so, I think it's made of 20% organic compost, 25 - 30% sand, 15% mulch and the rest plain dirt. That's the soil that I used in general for all planting beds (surrounding the grass area). I used around 40 cubic yards of it for an area about 3000 sq ft; but, knowing "the special taste" of the Acer Palmatums for soils with good drain, sligth acidic, very ligth soil, moist (but not wet); I spend some additional money to planted them with a mix of 40% of Peat Moss (Scotts), 20% Organic compost and 40% of Soil for Trees&Shrubs from Scotts and cover with about 3" of mulch. Also, (and very important, as I confirmed) I have to plant all A.P. "on top" of my existing -heavy clay- soil; just to obtain good drainage. I also installed 4" perforated pipe drain underground to allow and facilitate the natural slope of the garden, because here have heavy rains sometimes. That's the reason that in the pictures of the maples that I posted you can see growing on tops of the little "hills".

    Soon we continue with this topic. Do you have some pictures?

    Nelson
     
  21. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Thank you Jan, for your good wishes. About Layering, I alredy read, that the layering process (as opposed to grafting), you don't have to cut branches at the beguinning. Quite the opposite, just remove a small section of the bark and cover with peat moss or some other medium with the goal to develop some roots in this part, and of couse this area must be mantained slightly moist. The goog thing abouth Layering, is that if it fails, at least, you don't sacrifice the whole plant. I'm planning to try this method next fall with two branches on one of my AP Sangu Kaku or the AP Atropurpureum because they already have some branchs that are ideal to make a try. Another advantage, (if the layering is a success), is that you'll obtain a new plant whitout the section of the grafting, so it will look more natural, and all of this witout kill the host plant.

    I read that you have one of my favorites: the Acer Shirasawanum "Aureum", and I'm looking foward to add this cultivar to my collection, but It's very hard to find this kind of AP here.

    well Jan, keep going and don't quit. I read a lot about grafting and I know that isn't easy to reach some success at the begining. According to the experts, it needs a lot of practice and sometimes (specially with the A.Ps) a little bit of good luck, also.

    Regards
    Nelson
     
  22. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    Nelson,
    Here is my little collection. Some of them don't look good at this time. The temperator here goes over 100F somedays. I hope all of you can view these images.
    1-Beni Onishi-with me for 1 year.
    2-Red Dragon-it is about 4 ft tall now-barely bought it.
    3-Orinodo Nishiki-with me for 4 months
    4-These trees I bought online-Fireglow, Osakazuki, Japanese Sunrise, Korean Gem (very strong)
    5-My SangoKaku in "Summer"-Died!

    I can't wait until Fall to see how their color look like.
     

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  23. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi Hanl,
    They are pretty beatiful trees, and they look nice (pretty good yard, Hanl). The last picture of Sango Kaku looks that it has stress, and that's the reason to lost all it leaves, but you are saying it died. Did you give it a second chance? It was complete "dryed" or death? For the picture, I think it was located in a "lower spot" of the slope in your backyard and this fact could develop root rot. Did you check its roots?. Probably you can try to "upper" the roots and improve the soil as I did.
    About the look of the threes, same happen with most of my threes, right now. When the summer here, most of them are showing some degree of stress due the high temperature, and sun exposure. My three sango Kakus (two of them are in full morning sun and also part of afternoon), show leaves scorching and tip burning, but most of the leaves are keeping the color. The Butterfly is doing very well (even in full sun), but most of the dissectums (Viridis, Seryus, Waterfalls) are showing leaves with burning tips. I already build a temporary shade area using a shade cloth and some lumber just to keep part of my collection of JMs out of the noon/afternoon sun. Also I had to prune the two green JMs due a severe burning of the leaves and made a "test prune" of the leaves in some of the disecttums, and for my surprise, a week later they're producing new sprouts and leaves. I'm keeping them well watered, but depending how the JMs are performing with these high temperature and hot days; I'm planning to add more shade cloth to protect the rest of JMs that I already planted on soil.

    Soon I will to post more pictures of my JMs.

    See ya!

    Nelson
     
  24. blake

    blake Active Member

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    Nelson, hello from a fellow Texan. I wanted to comment on your interest in Acer shirasawanum Aureum and Acer shirasawanum Autumn Moon. I'm very fond of those forms too but was given advice by someone who knows a considerable amount about growing Japanese Maples in Texas that they really struggle in our heat and as a result the fall color is very poor for us. For that reason he doesn't sell them anymore. Instead, I was told to consider Moonrise, a new form of Acer Palmatum Shirasawarum that has shown good heat tolerance in North Texas. You might do the same.
     
  25. hanl

    hanl Active Member

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    Yes, I am gonna dig that Sangokaku and check it out. Maybe I need to relocate other trees a litte bit higher ground just for good.
    Blake, I heard about the Moonrise a little bit, but they are new and rare right now. Do you know where we get them from? If you have any info, please let us know. Very appreciate it. Since the temperature is getting more and more hot in here, all my JMs don't look so good with the heat. I am looking for a good heat tolerant one.
     

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