Acer shishigashira air-layering?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by AlainK, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,381
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Hi everyone,

    Has anybody had any success air-layering an acer palmatum 'shishigashira'?

    If so, what is the best procedure (technique, timing, ...) ?

    Alain
     
  2. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,801
    Likes Received:
    1,642
    Location:
    Normandie, France
    Harris says air-layering is possible but doesn't give more details. You could contact him and inquire about advice; or, just give it the old college try! ;)

    Never tried it myself. So, you think more people are layering maples here than in America, rather than grafting? Ou ils se trouvent? :)

    -E
     
  3. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,381
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Well, Emery, I think I read somewhere on this site that grafting was more popular in the US than propagating cultivars by cuttings, or air-layering: I lurked for a couple of weeks before registering...

    Well, in the bonsai community: you don't want an ugly bulge and a difference in the bark texture and colour on a bonsai, so for species that are difficult to propagate by cuttings, air-layering is the best way to clone a tree.
     
  4. xman

    xman Active Member

    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Plano TX USA
  5. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,381
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Thanks xman, I'll give it a try.
     
  6. mattlwfowler

    mattlwfowler Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    South Carolina, USA
    I have tried it a couple of times but on a tree in a great deal of sun and I was unsuccessful due to the summer heat. I will be planning on trying another one in the shade this summer.
     
  7. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,381
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Thanks a lot for your input, it is very encouraging. So it is possible, that's good news.

    Of course, we have different weather conditions over here, but hopefully this summer may be less rotten than last year... ^^
     
  8. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,801
    Likes Received:
    1,642
    Location:
    Normandie, France
    Hi Alain,

    I don't know much about bonsai. But certainly it is true here as everywhere that most maples are propagated by grafting. I have browsed the bonsai store near Gare Montparnasse (sorry can't give a better address) and their A. palmatum specimens were grafted. Perhaps they were knock offs of some kind.

    Cuttings are difficult where palmatums are concerned, although some have reported success the general impression is negative.

    Hope you haven't been too hurt by the spring frosts this year, and indeed let's hope we get a few days without rain this summer... ;)

    -E
     
  9. mattzone5b

    mattzone5b Active Member

    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Winchester,Va. US
    air-layering provide better roots than cuttings?

    I understand that propagating maples from cuttings sometimes can be done but the root structure isn't as as good as grafted trees with many cultivars of acer palmatum in particular. Anyone had their acer palmatums do well when done from air layering even a few years later?

    It seems to me that air layering can actually develop a stronger root system than propagation from cuttings. I saw the Trident Maple develop root flare from the air layering? I am guessing cuttings don't get root flare and that can be a issue? I am a novice to all of this but trying to understand if its worth a shot, especially for bonzai.

    If you have air layered trees that have lived more than two or three years afterward, let me know what cultivars you have had success with. I am guessing Trident maples are fine but what about Japonicums and Palmatums after a few years? I also thought that air layering might be ok for bonzai but not as desirable for "normal" size in ground trees?
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2008
  10. Dave Burns

    Dave Burns Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fla panhandle
    If you are creating a Bonsai ,and want a root system at a particular place on the trunk and as the shishigashira is a green maple , you might approach graft several small green maple seedlings(just plain old acer palmatum) in a circle around the trunk.

    Let them grow until they have fused to the main trunk. I would encircle the trunk and seedlings with a couple of split plastic pots filled with whatever soil you intend to use for your future bonsai. All the seedlings in one area will probably give you a swelled nebari. A good thing eh?. Since the tree isn't depending on just the seedling roots, you can trim them for more ramification.
    I'm getting ready to do this with an AP Seryu. Just an idea.

    I don't see much differance in "Plain" Green Acer Palmatum, seedlings, cuttings, or airlayering, as far as strength. I have several of each thriving in our N Fl. sun and sand for the last six years.
    In my limited experiance the named cultivars don't seem to be as strong on their own roots ,with a few exceptions ( AP Glowing embers). But if they are in a Bonsai pot you can give them personal, individual care.

    For me , Air layering is more sure than cuttings. Approach grafting seedling roots where you want them is more sure than airlayering ( you may get only one root)
    terrible for bonsai.

    I'm suggesting this out as one possible means to a Maple Bonsai . Not for the production of a great number of named cultivars.
    good Luck
    Dave.
     
  11. Dave Burns

    Dave Burns Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fla panhandle
    Opps! forgot something. The artical on airlayering the Trident Maple is dead on.
    I would lump airlayering a trident maple in there with Plain Old green A Palmatum.Probably going to get a lot of roots.
    BUT I wouldn't bet that air layering AP sishigashira would give you good rooting, and possibly none.
    Hopefully if someone has had success with them they will respond.
    Good Luck
    Dave.
     
  12. KevB

    KevB Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Wales, UK
    Reviving an old post to add some information. I airlayered Shishigashira succesfully in spring 2008, following the example of one of my mentors, Craig Coussins. I used my standard method, ring bark about 1", scrape cambium layer away, dust upper cut with hormone, wrap with moist shredded sphagnum moss, wrap with plastic bag and tape tightly. For me in zone 9 full sun speeds rooting but means regular checking for moisture. I use an old inkjet refill syring, to pierce and squirt water in.

    It was separated late autumn 2008 and overwintered in a frost free glasshouse.

    Buds are just starting to swell for this year, so I guess it is happy still.
     
  13. AlainK

    AlainK Generous Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,381
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Thanks for your input, Kev.

    I've left it grow for one more year without doing anything, but the branches are thick enough now to try next spring.

    I feel more confident on the result now that I've read about your personal experience.
     
  14. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,688
    Likes Received:
    669
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    KevB, would you mind if I ask what type or brand of hormone powder you use?

    My own efforts at air-layering JM's have been done without hormones, and while some cultivars root quickly this way, others are very slow.
     
  15. KevB

    KevB Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Wales, UK
    Hi, I always use a rooting hormone and the results are usually good. I used to use Bio Strike Hormone Rooting Powder but for the last two years have been using B&Q liquid rooting solution. I think that this is an organic one. It smells nasty but is very effective.

    This whole group of 9 standard green Acer palmatum were airlayered a few years ago by the method I described. They colour up nicely in Autumn!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/45951840@N00/2935541032
    and from the back
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevbailey/310533043/
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  16. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    Wow KevB,

    Remarkable craftiness!
     
  17. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,688
    Likes Received:
    669
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    Thanks KevB, should be able to get either of those no problem.

    Enjoyed the pics too.
     

Share This Page