Acer Seeds

Discussion in 'Maples' started by LoverOfMaples, Oct 3, 2019.

  1. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples New Member

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    Hello everyone!

    I collected a few different types of acer seeds and was wondering if they all have the same stratification process to germinate as palmatum?

    I collected:
    Acer Campestre
    Acer Monspessulanum
    Acer Pseudosieboldianum
    Acer Pubinerve
    Acer Heldreichii
    Acer Shirasawanum var Tenuifolum
    Acer Tataricum
     
  2. emery

    emery Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Well this is an easy answer: yes! :)

    The only thing is the first two may need to be double stratified (cold/warm/cold).

    Where did you get these? Not that easy to collect A. pubinerve (= A. wuyuanense) walking around town. BTW, the genus name is always capitalized, but not the species name. So should be, e.g. Acer campestre. FWIW!

    cheers, -E
     
  3. Margot

    Margot Well-Known Member

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    Do these maples come true from seed or do they cross pollinate with other compatible maples in the area? Just curious.
     
  4. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples New Member

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    Im so glad to hear that. I visited the Arnold Arboretum and it open my eyes to so many different type of beautiful Acers.

    Thanks a lot for the info!
     
  5. emery

    emery Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    They mostly hybridize quite easily. The exceptions are the first two. At least I can't think of any monspessulanum hybrids off hand. I often get true seed from pseudosieboldianum, but of course the entire new "hardy range" (Jack Frost?) from Iseli are hybrids of pseudosieboldianum and palmatum.

    Come to think of it, can't think of any pubinerve hybrids either, but it's so rare that may be why. I only know one person who tried to grow these seeds, he was unsuccessful; but that's not to say they haven't grown any at the Morris in PA, where the best one I know of in the US grows. Interesting that the Arnold has now adopted the FOC naming, the name pubinerve isn't universally accepted (yet).

    Indeed the Arnold is amazing! I used to live in Boston, really loved the place. Another great place for maples there is the Mt Auburn Cemetery. if you're up in town and have time.

    -E
     
  6. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples New Member

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    Im going to give pubinerve a shot and keep my fingers crossed that i can get one to germinate.

    I ran by iseli "jack forst" selection a little while ago. They create a good number of things over there. Next time im visiting east coast i will have to visit.

    By the way, Mt Auburn cemetery is definitely on my to go list this fall. I made a small list of places to visit this fall in early spring. Once i got to the Arnold i kicked myself for not visiting sooner and more often. Ill be going back in a few weeks and mid Nov for the color change. From the pic online of the cemetery i think ill be kicking myself again.

    Thanks again E for sharing such great information!
     
  7. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    You inspired me to visit the Japanese garden in Tallinn Kadriorg Park, to find out if I can pick some Acer palmatum seeds, but unfortunately these 2 plants of that species, that I managed to find there, are still too young to bear fruits. Hence I'd like to ask, what age these maples are supposed to fruit? I did not manage to get an answer from Wikipedia and from quick search in the Internet, so I would be thankful, if someone can enlighten me in that matter.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2019
  8. emery

    emery Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    There is no hard and fast answer. Some trees flower and fruit quite young, whereas others take many years. Exposition and water supply probably play a role. I don't know if any research has been done specifically relating to A. palmatum.

    It's not too late to sign up for the Maple Society seed distribution, you will get plenty of palmatum seed that way!
     
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  9. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Thanks for hinting to the Maple Society seed distribution scheme (I suppose that this is their website: Seed Distribution Scheme - 2019 | The Maple Society)! Unfortunately I am living in a very harsh climate for palmatums, so rather than selection by tree size, I'd prefer selection by the frost hardiness. I was hoping, that by picking some seeds from palmatums, that are already selected to be relatively tolerant in our climate (and actually managed to survive here), I will manage to decrease the risk of loosing all my seedlings.
     
  10. emery

    emery Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Ah yes I see. Well you never know, hardiness is different for different seedlings. For example I grew Acer caudatifolium and started with perhaps 75 seedlings, of which perhaps 50 froze and died the first winter. But the survivors were only the hardiest, and in the end I have a group doing well in the ground, with many others given away or not proving hardy enough to survive.

    I see your point, but it may be the harsh conditions that are preventing these from seeding. You may want to try A. shirasawanum and A. pseudosieboldianum, which are hardier than A. palmatum. I sent the former into the seed distribution, but didn't have any of the later this year. If you PM me next fall I can send you some pseudosieboldianum if you want. Anyway you may need to grow quite a few seedlings to find some that are hardy in your zone...
     
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  11. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Actually I am not so competent to confidently identify Asian maples. I know, that there is large number of variations in each of these species, so maybe those "palmatums" are not palmatums at all. I remember, that when this Japanese garden was created (on 2011), then there were labels at most significant species, but yesterday there was no labels any more. I am not visiting this far corner of the park very often, so I can't tell, if these plants are still the same, that were planted more than 8 years ago or they are replaced already. I noticed, that these maples had leaf damages near the top, that could be caused by recent frosts. Took a photo (sorry, there is a "dark age" here, my phone can't do nice pictures at such a dim conditions) and attached to this message.
    I try to keep your kind offer in my mind! Thank you!
     

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