Acer palmatum 'Higasa yama'

Discussion in 'Acer palmatum cultivars (photos)' started by Elmore, Jan 1, 2004.

  1. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Lois, Maybe the soil is too fertile or the addition of fertilizers is affecting the tree.
     
  2. mapledia

    mapledia Active Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Siskiyou mountains, so. OR
    I've had my Higasa Yama for 6 years or so, and it has performed admirably with beautiful spring color and interesting leaves throughout the year. I've had some years where a couple branches have "gone native" with total green, and I've done nothing to them. And the following year I find they come back to the variegation normal for Higasa Yama. However, in 2008 I found two branches that behaved differently ... they appeared to be on steroids and grew wildly and looked peculiar to this tree. I cut one off at the base during the winter, and I cut the other one back drastically but not totally (I wanted to see what it would produce). What it produced were totally green leaves, so in the spring I lopped it off. This strategy has worked for me, at least. I don't do anything to branches that have gone native as long as they look normal because they tend to look fine the next year. But the abnormal growth is, I think, probably better to cut out.
     
  3. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Easton, CT
    Many thanks for your replies. I do not add fertilizers to my trees, only dress all of the beds in my garden with a rotted leaf mulch in the spring. I see on the photographs of a few of the previous replies to this thread the same kind of larger green leaves that I am getting, and others write of seeing something similar, with their trees returning to the original leaf size and patterning the following year, so I am encouraged. I am wondering if the differences on the same tree are similar to the different leaves that appear on my 'Koto no Ito' with the signature very thin leaves supplemented by larger leaves later in the spring.
     
  4. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,771
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Lois, That's normal for 'Koto No Ito', and reversions are normal for 'Higasa yama' , also, but rich soils may cause more reversion among some of the variegated cultivars it seems.
     
  5. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Easton, CT
    Terrific! One thing I can take off my 'worry list' --many thanks!
     
  6. vinc la pergola

    vinc la pergola Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    carhaix france
    hi
    Acer palmatum HIGASA YAMA in my garden
     

    Attached Files:

  7. mattlwfowler

    mattlwfowler Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    298
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    South Carolina, USA
    Whew, that is much pinker than my "higasayama". Thanks for the photograph there; I think that helps me a bit with what Jim has been saying about Hikasayama vs Higasayama. I would love to see some more photos of your tree in summer and in fall if possible.
     
  8. STi

    STi Active Member

    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    CT,USA
    Strong durable tree.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. timnichols

    timnichols Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    East Flat Rock, NC
    Higasayama in late April or early March on the left. On the right is a 'Hikasa yama' in my yard in the shade in early July
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 30, 2010
  10. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Easton, CT
    This post reminded me that I had wanted to update my 5/30/2009 post with photos I took of my 'Higasa yama' late in 2009 (the two on the left) that show its very aggressive 'super leaves'. Happily, the tree is much better behaved this year and shows far less reversion than last year, as seen in the more recent photo on the right. One reason for the difference may be that last year I very diligently and repeatedly cut out the 'super leaves' (obviously to no avail) but have left them alone this year (?).
     

    Attached Files:

  11. winterhaven

    winterhaven Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Western Washington, USA
    Same location?

    I've had mine in numerous locations and it does a little something different every place. The very first place I put it I received a great performance. But Hubby pointed out it would soon be in a view line so I moved it. And I've been moving it trying to get the correct expression back. It seems like more sun is more likely to give me color. The last place I had it the tree had more sun that the one before and the tree had at least some tricolor leaves. But the branches were reaching for the sun. I'm giving it one more spot and then I just might chuck it (well, give it away). I just don't have very many sunny locations and may not have a spot that will suit the tree.

    Sure would be nice to have one that looks as nice as the one in previous posts, especially #31.
     
  12. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Easton, CT
    Yes, same place. Light shade most of the day.
     
  13. timnichols

    timnichols Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    East Flat Rock, NC
    Sometimes excess nitrogen in the soil can cause more reversions in 'Higasa yama'. This has to be one of my favorite maples. I tend to get best color with morning sun/afternoon shade. Dappled light also works well here. Here are some more photos of a few of my 'Higasa yama'.

    I am pretty sure these are of 'Higasa yama' because all reversions return to varigation the following year. I love this maple so much that I will be looking to add 'Hikasa yama' and 'Shinn's #2' in the future.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. maf

    maf Well-Known Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    1,352
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Northamptonshire, England
    This 'Higasa yama' at Batsford Arboretum looks to be a decent age and appears to have kept the variegation well. No spring pictures, unfortunately, all pics from September 2010:

    Higasayama 1.jpg Higasayama 3.jpg Higasayama 2.jpg

    Higasayama 4.jpg Higasayama 5.jpg Higasayama 6.jpg
     
  15. rwinktown

    rwinktown Active Member

    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Seattle
    7-13-2011 took this pic this afternoon and is doing great!
     

    Attached Files:

  16. mapledia

    mapledia Active Member

    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Siskiyou mountains, so. OR
    I do believe that Higasa Yama is one of the most unique of the JMs. Mine has good years and bad years, but during the good years there's nothing so sublime as the color of Higasa Yama. I love how the new leaves at first look like little fists like popcorn that pop out and unfurl. It's pretty special.
     
  17. winterhaven

    winterhaven Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Western Washington, USA
    Spring 2012
     

    Attached Files:

  18. MarkVIIIMarc

    MarkVIIIMarc Active Member

    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    Mine puts on quite the spring show. Fall is oretty tame. I moved it to a more shaded location and last year it reponed with a heck of a late growth spurt that was mostly green. This uear it is variegated as strong as ever.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page