Identification: Acer Palmatum Dissectum

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Kanuni, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. Kanuni

    Kanuni Active Member

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    I just bought this dissectum type about 2 weeks ago. Although it was the middle of July, it still had a wonderful red color. The guy in the nursery said it was A. Palmatum Dissectum Atropurpureum, I thought it could be something else due to its unusual color at this time. What cultivar could this tree be? Dissectum Garnet maybe? Its leaves are somewhat larger than the other dissectums I have.

    P.S: The photos don't exactly show the true color. The color is much more shinier and brighter than it looks.
     

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  2. jwsandal

    jwsandal Active Member

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    what a beautiful tree for July- truly unusual to have such a red color for this time of year. the first question I would have is, is this a grafted tree? can you see a graft scar? the name Acer palmatum dissectum form atropurpureum is a descriptor more than a cultivar but an accurate one if this was grown from seed. If this is the case, this tree would be worth watching and propogating if it holds this color year around.

    as far as which cultivar it might be would be almost impossible to tell as their is so little difference within the red disected cultivars in my area and culture anyway. vertrees reports red dragon as a cultivar that holds it color well and, in my area in good sunlight, 'Tamuke yama' and 'Inaba shidare' hold their color well. My 'Garnet' and 'Crimson Gueen' do not and are largely green by now.

    Keep in mind variability in color is tremendous, even year to year, and from location to location, even within the same plant. Either way this one is worth watching closely and I hope it is just as beautiful next year in July.

    Justin
     
  3. Kanuni

    Kanuni Active Member

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    I really can't tell if it has a grafting scar. I have uploaded close up photos near its bottom. Can you tell if it is grafted by looking at the pictures.

    Btw, the photos I have taken with my cell phone seems to resemble the tree better color-wise. The last 2 photos are from my cellphone.
     

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  4. jwsandal

    jwsandal Active Member

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    That would be a 'definite maybe' on grafting scar. Most scars go away with time anyway but hard to tell from picture. Could be named cultivar, or seedling, or a grafted seedling even. Either way, prettier than any red disected cultivar in my collection.

    Justin
     
  5. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member 10 Years

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    Ok,I expect a lot of dissagreement saying this but I've said it before.Time&time again,when visiting nurseries/garden centres over here,the brightest red trees are always marked as 'Atropurpureum'.
    It seems to me that the majority of red cultivars have been selected for their heat tolerance,but the trade off is their summer colour is dark purple,bronzing out at the extremes of sun or shade.I've mentioned before I saw a couple of super red dissectums,they were top worked(grafted)but were again 'Atros'.I've just got in a second batch of 50 red rootstocks,all 100 were as bright as your tree,and put my cultivars to shame.
    Ok,with these unnamed seed grown trees,we cannot predict their heat tolerance,or indeed their growth pattern/size exactly.They will also go purple in a lot of sun or even burn....but if you've got a maple friendly space(not too sunny or shaded) they can have a red colour that most cultivars cannot achieve...my opinion only:)
     
  6. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    It looks like I can see the scar from a "V" graft (I am sure there is a better term for this) a little below the first branch in the close-up photographs.
     

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