Acer Palmatum Bonsai

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Lois Bloom, Nov 13, 2007.

  1. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    I thought the many maple enthusiasts on this site might enjoy a photo of a truly special Bonsai specimen, 'forest' style, on show right now as part of the Kiku exhibit at the New York Botanical Garden.
     

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  2. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    Just an amazing photo - I too like the "forest style" pics of japanees maple bonsai. I counted about 30 "trunks" there!
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I've never seen anything like that before. Thank you.
     
  4. Dale B.

    Dale B. Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    That's what trays of rootstock look like if you don't get busy grafting. :)
     
  5. SUNRIZE

    SUNRIZE Active Member

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    Hi Lois,

    Just beautiful!!!.. :) I really miss Fall colors down here.. :(
     
  6. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    i agree very beautiful!!! for me too that not love bonsai
     
  7. Maple Sydney

    Maple Sydney Member

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    For that sytle of bonsai, how the hell do you root trim it? Do you just yank it off the stone plate or something?

    It also looks like it's more than 5 feet tall. Which makes root trimming even more difficult.
     
  8. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    I don't know how the root trimming is done; it isn't my plant. But without actually having measured it, I estimate that it is less than 3 feet tall
     
  9. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    At NYBG again today (I am a docent there) and took several other photographs. First, and most important, to give credit-where-credit-is-due: The Acer bonsai was created by Saeko Oshiro who is with the Shanti Bithi Nursery in Stamford, CT and I've uploaded a photo with the identifying information.

    TO Maple Sydney: You have a better eye than I have memory; the Acer bonsai is closer to 4 feet high, perhaps a few inches higher.

    Have also uploaded photos of two other bonsai in the exhibit, one of which is also on a stone slab. The gingko bonsai was also created by Saeko Oshiro at the Shanti Bithi Nursery in Stamford, CT (in case the identifying plate can't be read). These follow.
     

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  10. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    Re: Other Bonsai at NYBG

    Here are photographs of the two other bonsai examples I promised. Again, the Gingko bonsai is the work of Saeko Oshiro from the Shanti Bithi Nursery, Stamford CT
     

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  11. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    hi lois,

    Any more maple bonsai there?
     
  12. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Very nice photos, would you know what the rounded forms are growing below the juniper ?
     
  13. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    Paxi: Wonderful examples of Acer Palmatum in the exhibit, but the one I shared is the only Bonsai.

    Chimera: Those are mosses of different kinds.
     
  14. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Thought maybe mosses, interesting shapes, somewhat like the foliaged areas on the tree. Thank you.
     
  15. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    ohh lets see more of the acer palmatum!!
     
  16. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    Sorry to disappoint you, but I only took photos of a few trees --the Koto-no-ito because I don't have it (yet) in my garden and want to try to find it; the Atropurpureum because I am trying to identify a similar cultivar I do have in my garden; and the Bergundy Lace (photo is somewhat overexposed, sorry).
     

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  17. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    Oh no disappointments here. I like the Koto no ito in particular. I have found photographing japanese maples more challenging than I thought. My far away shots dont seem to capture the delicate nature and structure of the trees and my close ups don't seem quite right either. I look forward to learning a more about my little digital camera.
    thanks again
     
  18. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    I'll have to bookmark this one. I'm not quite ready for a Bonsai until we can sell our home and relocate.

    But in the next garden, I'd like a Bonsai arrangement, even a big one.

    Wasn't sure what to try, but that grove looks like a style I'd really enjoy. It reminds me of all the alder trunks on the way to the Oregon coast, but miniature and with better autumn color.
     
  19. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Bonsai and a picture of a forest planting was the reason I decided to plant some acer seed. I thought it would be fun to find similar seedlings and plant them together in a low cedar box. Over the years I thought they would really look nice and since they are seedlings even if I look for some that have common leaf characteristics there would still be variation in the coloration, etc. therefore looking like a real forest. It will take a few years to get seedlings of that size, but by then I'm hoping to know what I'm doing as far as container planting and the right soil mix so I don't kill everything. I don't know how people grow them on a slab like that. The watering would be so critical, you wouldn't be able to leave home for a day. Although, I guess there could be some kind of drip watering setup?
    Kay Dye
     
  20. Lois Bloom

    Lois Bloom Member

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    Not a Bonsai expert myself (I only took the picture), I do understand that daily watering is critical for all Bonsai and caring for a Bonsai, in general, is like having a pet. Good luck with yur forest!
     
  21. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    Maples, both as forests or as single trees are some of the best and most classical bonsai subjects. To people (like myself not too long ago) that have only seen twisty little junipers in funny pots called "bonsai", trees like that are a real wake-up call about what bonsai really is.

    As for the root trimming, it's not a problem. To make a group like that you plant the trees together and let them grow for a number of years. The roots all grow and mix together. After that time the whole group can be lifted and the root pad treated as if it is one tree.

    Here, have some more pics...

    http://www.artofbonsai.org/critiques/waltermaple.php

    http://www.bonsaigardener.org/japanese-maple-care.html
     

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