Appreciation: Acer not bothered by wind

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Fabrice, Mar 26, 2011.

  1. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    Good evening everyone.

    I would appreciate some help here in my search of an Acer for a friend of mine that would not be bothered by wind. I'm not restricting my search to Acer Palmatum but to Acers in general.

    Ideally it would be sturdy, fast growing, not bothered by wind, rain and salty air...and quite remarkable in its changing colors. 4/6 meters high.

    An Acer V shaped splitting low into several trunks would be a dream come true.

    I know...It's a lot.. but who knows if this gem or something close exists ?
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Acer pseudoplatanus is by far the best for not being bothered by wind or salty air, and is sturdy and fast growing, but it has poor autumn colours and gets to much more than 4/6 metres.

    Acer campestre is slightly less good with wind and salty air, but does have slightly better autumn colour.
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Acer circinatum?
     
  4. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    Thanks !
    I looked up those on esveld.nl
    I think i'll go for Acer Circinatum :)
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I don't remember seeing vine maple near the beach, here in its native area. I think using that one might backfire. A smaller-growing garden form of sycamore maple might work out better.
     
  6. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I also think circinatum would be a mistake. Why not A. tartaricum ssp ginalla? (A. ginalla for Michael ;)) I've seen them near the ocean, deals well with wind, brilliant fall color, pretty spring flowers.

    There are some forms of pseudoplatanus var atropurpureum that are smaller, but I don't recall seeing a selection. Good with salt, but not much for fall colors. Some pseudoplatanus do make a fine yellow, however, even if to large for the job.

    -E
     
  7. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I agree with Emery. There are a number of ginalla cultivars to choose from. Truncatum could also be an alternative

    Gomero
     
  8. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    Thanks !
     
  9. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I agree with Ron about Vine Maple. Mostly
    seen inland coastal and inland in Oregon rather
    than seen native to the coast. Sycamore Maple
    is a fine choice. In cooler areas that do get a
    definite Fall season the yellow to golden Fall
    colors can be good.

    Another Maple that is wind (both cold and heat)
    tolerant for us here is Trident Maple but not all
    cultivar forms that have the waxy cuticle will be
    warm to hot wind and hot sun tolerant however.

    I really don't think ginalla will like sustained salty
    marine air with warm to hot winds if that air helps
    lead to a saline to alkaline soil condition. If the soil
    stays on the acid side then okay I can go along with
    it up to a point. I do know that Amur Maple does not
    like dried salt residue or Calcium deposit from overhead
    sprinkler watering on the dry leaves for any length of
    time around here with our heat and hot winds (the Lime
    residue on a warm dry leaf leads to lobe burn and tip and
    margin scorch in areas with warm to hot wind conditions.
    In cooler areas leaf burn and scorch are not nearly as
    much of an issue).

    Jim
     
  10. Fabrice

    Fabrice Active Member Maple Society

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    Thanks Jim.
    You always give detailed answers. I ( and I'm sure I'm not the only one ) appreciate this.

    Fabrice.
     
  11. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

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    Hi Fabrice,

    I have a garden by the sea where it is quite windy from October to April/May. We don't really get hot windy days very often. We do get salty fog and mist year round. I have a pair of A.P. Matsugae that have been happy in an exposed location in lg. pots for about 8 or 10 years.
     

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  12. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    BTW ginalla often forms a multi-stemmed tree.

    WRT Jim, I don't think hot winds are such a problem in France. Anyway on Ile de Groix I have seen large and healthy ginallas used as a windbreak, so I really don't think there is much of a problem here with that choice.

    Coincidentally also on Ile de Groix, in a cleft in the cliff following a stream down to the ocean, I saw the prettiest natural pseudoplatanus atropurpureums I have seen anywhere. Just gorgeous to come on a grove of them like that in natural habitat, and in a wild place.

    -E
     

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