Identification: A special plant

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by wmoran8393, Jan 13, 2009.

  1. wmoran8393

    wmoran8393 Member

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    cranston ,RI ,USA
    This is one of my favorite plants . I would like to propergate it but am not sure how .
    I put it outside for the summer and it flowers. My Location is RI
    Can anyone help me with the name of this plant.
    Thanks
    Warren
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Looks like Nerium oleander, Oleander.
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    If propagating it, be careful to avoid contact with the poisonous sap.
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Third'd for Nerium oleander. You can propagate it by cuttings, but be VERY VERY CAREFUL with it, since it is one of the most poisonous plants known to man. More about Oleander here.
     
  5. JenRi

    JenRi Active Member

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    Eeeeeee, that's kinda scary....not the sort of plant i'd want any where near my house!
     
  6. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    They're lovely boundary trees, and drought-hardy as heck. You just have to be careful with cutting or touching them.
     
  7. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    So. Oleander can cause the same kind of problems (if not more) if sap got on your skin, or accidentally got into your eyes, or throat, much like Euphorbia tirucalli can do?
     
  8. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Nope. Oleander doesn't necessarily cause any kind of contact irritation, but the compound Neriin, which is present in all parts of the plant, is a potent neurotoxin. Ingestion is more dangerous than simple contact; in fact, you can pet Oleander trees if you wish so long as you wash your hands in alcohol afterwards.
     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Didn't even think that was necessary, as long as you don't tear the foliage and get the sap on your skin. I've certainly handled Oleander foliage and not washed after with alcohol, and had no ill effects.
     
  10. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Ah, yes, but you are not in the Tropics, Michael. In the heat here, the whole plant exudes a toxic, but very sweet smelling, oil. Hence, I MUST wash after handling one. Interesting that it doesn't do that in cooler climes. Must be a heat reaction.
     
  11. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    In Palm Springs, right up the San Joaquin Valley, the Oleander shrub thrives, and I guess I have horse shoes since I have snapped off oodles of flowering branches, sap still dripping onto my bare hands with no ill effects, in the dead of summer at 115 F in the shade?

    I will be more careful next time!
     
  12. Bluewing

    Bluewing Well-Known Member

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    Well, I guess every person has a different level of resistance to toxins.

    Euphorbia tirucalli, another plant with a "reputation" did nothing to my skin after pruning, and if anyone has one of these plants, they know how much they can "bleed" once cut. I never thought to wash the sap off until I was all done, other then with a dry paper towel, like that would help:)
    That was before I knew the sap "could" cause skin irritations, so I'll wash real good afterward now, just to be on the safe side.
     
  13. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    wmoran,
    Just be VERY careful - In Hawaii it's common name is "maki die dead". I was told that if you used the branches to bar-B-Q food the food would be contaminated also.
    Yes if the climate is right it will grow anywhere. It is used in the mediums of freeways all over N. Calif. where it gets scant wathering if at all. Comes in many colors from white, pink, peach, dark red and even yellow as I remember. Barbara Lloyd
     

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