2024 Virtual Garden Tour - welcome!

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Georgia Strait, Jan 21, 2024.

  1. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    I decided to see what is happening in the gardens before the nice weather arrives and found some plants have really taken off....

    IMG 2103 & 2108 - apricots 'Harcot' and 'Moongold' (no bees to pollinate but I did notice many small "flies" on the buds).
    IMG 2110 - giant butterbur aka fuki is starting to send up flower stalks.
    IMG 2111 - red huckleberry is showing leaf buds (this is not an easy plant to grow in the city but it finally produced fruit for the first time last year).
    IMG 2113 & 2114 - mouse plant is not only starting to cover the ground but also the flowers are forming.
    IMG 2120 - pasque-flowers are appearing.
    IMG 2121 - honeysuckle 'Mandarin" went "from zero to sixty" in less than two weeks - it was totally bare of leaves at the beginning of the month.
    IMG 2122 - a mix of common and Cusick's camas.
    IMG 2123 - sedum 'Autumn Joy' is growing fast.
    IMG 2125 - ornamental onion 'Ambassador' is already about 20cm tall.
    IMG 2129 - almond 'Hall's Hardy' suffered from the cold but didn't lose all its flower buds.
    IMG 2130 - weeping larch no longer looks dead.
    IMG 2132 - bitter orange 'Flying Dragon' seedling.
    This appears to be the perfect "bomb-proof" citrus for Vancouver. Very slow growing to start but this little thing is among a dozen or so plants (that I have left after giving some away) that I germinated outside two years ago. And this is the second winter they spent outside unprotected even during this January's cold snap (I did up-pot them last fall to 1 gallons from the 8cm pots they spent the first winter in).
     

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  2. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    hello Pieter - it took me a while to understand the “lollipop” concept that @wcutler describes above

    for quick comparison - I took your plum photo and placed it next to what I know is a cherry (@Willard knows - next to truck unloading at SValu )

    I took the cherry photo yesterday Tue March 12/24

    plum = green oval
    Cherry = yellow oval

    the other ID detail I learned from Wendy is the OUTSIDE ends of petals
    Plums are rounded
    Cherries have a detailed notch

    Haha, I think I was diluting cherry blossom sightings thread with w my wandering pix of plums - Wendy politely fixed me on that :)
    Now I wish I could correct captions for eBay and Etsy, Amazon and so forth selling “cherry blossom pattern” scarves and painting reproductions etc
     

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  3. Pieter

    Pieter Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    P9800142-corydalis-solida-purplebird.JPG It seems as if almost every day there's something new popping up, like this Corydalis solida for example.
    P9800138-empresswu.JPG And the Empress appears ready to make a return: Hosta 'Empress Wu'.
    P9800149-iris-reticulata-louise.JPG While not newly in bloom as of today -the one top-right was in flower on the 3rd- it's nice to have them all in flower in this small 'stand', hopefully we'll see them multiply. This is Iris reticulata 'Louise', newly planted last fall.
    P9800151-anenome-nemerosa.JPG Anemonoides nemerosa is not quite in bloom yet but it won't be long. This a new transplant to a fairly bare spot under a Rhododendron that could use some colour to brighten up the area in the spring. I had a packed 2-gallon pot that needed trimming and found new homes in the yard for a couple of divisions.
    P9800162-dicentra-formosa.JPG Our native Western Bleeding Heart has established itself quite nicely in the leaf litter underneath a cedar hedge, won't be long before we'll see buds.
    P9800150-lilium-lancifolium.JPG Lilies are poking through seemingly everywhere, these are Lilium lancifolium.
    P9800170-camelia-buds.JPG With all this new growth around though there's an almost constant reminder of the January deep-freeze: I'm finding naught but brown Camelia buds, don't think I'll see any flowers on them this year and they're dropping leaves like crazy as well. And not just browned leaves, plenty of green ones down for the count.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2024
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  4. Pieter

    Pieter Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    GS, shows to go ya, not too old to learn @80 :)
     
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  5. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Today the tour here includes fauna - our coast garden birds we enjoy - adds cheer and busy energy

    towhee
    varies thrush (Oregon thrush)
    Anna’s hummingbirds
    Chickadees

    and in the photos attached - leucistic junco and its “normal color” friend

    different than “albino”

    I have seen a crow with similar patterns

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucism

    and way up above - photo with green oval - a flock of what I think are snow geese - make the photo big and you’ll see classic V shape flying North direction

    lots of geese chatter as they moved along swiftly to summer grounds
     

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  6. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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  7. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    a couple of years ago Margo I think we were learning various nature / garden words

    petrichor

    and the scent of fresh mown hay or lawn grass (apparently the grass is scared)

    i can’t think of the cut hay /grass word

    i might be confused about the word — maybe it is the sound of “whispering firs / pines” that has a special term word
     
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  8. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    There are several robins at the dog park we frequent...I suspect parent and offspring. The "adult" (aka Luke to the regular walkers, has been around for years) has a lot of white patches but the other two only have a bit of white; one on the head, the other on the back.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2024
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  9. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    I think the sun and warmth - even thought it is not yet spring - is starting to show what did survive the past weird winter months.

    IMG 2134 - hardy almond 'Texas Mission' faired better than 'Hall's Hardy'.
    IMG 2137 - ornamental cherry 'Fudan Zakura' did have some blossoms survive the January cold snap (luckily it starts to flower in December so I was able to enjoy a good show before then).
    IMG 2143 - Grecian windflowers are everywhere now.
    IMG 2145 - giant butter bur (aka fuki) is starting to pop up - first the flower stalk, followed by the leaves. It may not look too impressive now but by summer the leaves will be over 1M across.
    IMG2150 - some of my hellebores seem late this year; 'Golden Lotus' is just now starting to bloom.
    IMG 2151 - clematis 'Joe Zary' is doing really well even though it was flowering in December! (I should have taken a photo of the ice cover flowers in January....)
    IMG 2153 - here is a weird one - dead horse arum. Although on the tender side, it has never had any issues with the temperatures.
    IMG 2156 - toad shade is growing well and actually ahead of my western trilliums.
    IMG 2157 - double daffodils 'Kiwi Sunset'.
     

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  10. Pieter

    Pieter Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    P9800205-chionodoxa-forbesii-pinkgiant-crop.jpg With all that lovely sunshine of the past few days there's a lot of buzz around, like this busy bee laden with pollen in the patch of Chionodoxa forbesii.
    P9800219-crocus-purple.JPG P9800220-trillium-crop.jpg P9800226-dicentra-cuccularia.JPG P9800230-candytuft.JPG P9800229-primula.JPG P9800223-hostas.JPG
    OK, I cheated a little with the hostas in the last shot: they were forced and brought out to harden off in time for the Alpine Garden Club sale on April 6th.
     
  11. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Mouse Ears hostas?
     
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  12. Pieter

    Pieter Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    GS, there's no Mouse Ears in that shot, they're still inside, should have some for the sale though...
     
  13. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    The weather is getting better and it appears I have not lost as many plants as I thought....

    IMG 2160 - these dwarf variegated tulips are only about 10cm tall and have stripped leaves.
    IMG 2161 - this daffodil had an issue and only developed the lower half of the flower.
    IMG 2164 - western trilliums are now opening.
    IMG 2165 - these swamp lilies surprised me because they survived. I've had them for years but had to move the entire group (as they were no longer getting any sun) last fall. They are now located in an open - read more exposed - area but seemed to have had no issues with the funky winter weather we had.
    IMG 2169 - mouse plant.
    IMG 2170 - spotted lungwort
    IMG 2173 - the nectarine did not have as many flowers this year but we'll still get a crop.
    IMG 2176 - ribbon grass is now appearing in all the water features.
    IMG 2181 - haskap aka honey berries are starting to flower (this is the male, 'blue velvet').
    IMG 2184 - variegated mock strawberries are starting to cover the ground in patches.
    IMG 2188 - young blackberry lilies are appearing. These were seed grown last spring (from my older plants) and should be flowering for the first time this year.
     

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  14. Pieter

    Pieter Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Today was one of those days in the Lower Mainland where you simply couldn't resist poking around in the garden, what a bonus day after yesterday's rain. The rain however did provide for some photogenic situations though...like this picture of Hosta 'Nightlife'.
    P9800271-nightlife.JPG P9800277-trillium-ovatum.JPG And the Trillium ovatum....
    P9800282-lamprocapnos-spectabilis-alba.JPG Lamprocapnos spectabilis '
    Alba'
    P9800289-dicentra-cucullaria-crop.jpg Dicentra cucullaria
    P9800295-chinesesunrise.JPG
    And one of my favourite springtime beacons: Hosta 'Chinese Sunrise'.
    P9800298-martagon-fairymorning.JPG
    Some potted Martagon Lilies setting buds already. This is 'Fairy Morning'.
     
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  15. vitog

    vitog Contributor 10 Years

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    That's strange: I've never heard of a dioecious Haskap, and the Blue Velvet variety produces fruit, according to Web info.
     
  16. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    I always call it "male" because the tag said so when I got them almost 20 years ago - the other plants are 'blue moon'. My understanding is that you require 2 cultivars to get fruit. I have 2 'blue velvet' and 2 'blue moon' and have only ever got fruit from 'blue moon' even though they flower at the same time. 'Blue velvet' is actually half the size of 'blue moon' and I grow them under 'blue moon'.... I just find it much easier to simply identify them as male and female.

    According to the U of SK, "Generally speaking, closely related plants will not set fruit with each other. Haskap plants have complete flowers meaning they have pollen and ovules. Haskap does NOT have separate male and female plants. When two compatible haskap varieties are planted close to each other, both bushes will set fruit. But it is not enough to have compatible pollen. To pollinate each other both plants must bloom at the same time and be genetically compatible. At the U of SK, we categorize our varieties and breeding stock into 5 bloom periods: very early, early, mid, late, and very late. There is overlap between nearby groups but peak bloom is usually 5 days different between categories. For example, it is estimated that a very early and an early haskap will overlap 75% of the time".
     
  17. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Garden tour Monday March 25th at the Coast

    a wee bit chilly temp incl rain compared to our Monday last week, lulling us into spring sunshine comfort

    i find it interesting to learn of other garden tours here in this thread and what possible microclimates they host

    i wonder how you and your garden are, too @Margot

    I must say, I am gradually accustomed now to that time change and for commuters, it is moving back dawn daylight around 6:30am :)

    and some geese formations flew over recently (ie the migrating geese) - very exciting and I certainly admire their organized pattern V shape and honking chorus - a lot of work

    PHOTOS

    elderberry with red berries to come after blossom - it’s “wild” and I like it because the birds and bees like it in its various stages —- and as you can see in photo - the little woodpeckers like the deceased wood; they work away quietly (vs their flicker friends who are busy drilling noises on power utility poles and neighbours’ metal chimney caps)

    speaking of spring birds, a towhee has been busy attacking his own reflection in the car side mirrors —- if it’s not bears, deer, racoons … it’s towhees :)

    NEXT PHOTO
    I have been experimenting with fern a in containers and esp those that are evergreen (ie leafy year round) —- I am happy with tassel fern and there is a mini daffodil tête à tête in same container

    3. & 4. Photos: Frittaliara (checkered Lily) almost to bloom in a container with possibly Alaska fern … I’ve lost the label for the fern

    we have these lilies in Okanagan forest too — moist areas, well drained — I think siens peopple call them chocolate Lily —- they have a distinct checkerboard pattern on petals

    PHOTOS 5 & 6
    Needs no introduction and it’s glorious this year — I love forsythia as old fashioned as it may seem — sunshine on a cloudy day

    purple is a faithful PJM Rhodo —- intriguing leaf scent that is sort of vanilla or maybe Dr Pepper soda drink? I cannot ID. Ideas?

    PJM is I believe bred in Maine so it likes our climate here

    based on my ph photos that announce every detail reminder, I’d say PJM is a couple weeks early bloom compared to 2023 season

    the bumble bees sure like PJM

    PHOTO 7 - green leaves - that’s autumn crocus and it’s normal — I am glad to see it this spring —- last year, no sign of life so I kept it (there is a sentimental story to this plant) and lo behold, leaf life appears early 2024. I know another person’s tour posted earlier tho their leaves were earlier —- I’m sure we all look fwd to purple flowers when the time is right

    and that’s our tour for today - thank you
     

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  18. vitog

    vitog Contributor 10 Years

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    According to a few sites on the Web, those two varieties should be pollination-compatible in both directions. Perhaps Blue Velvet is shaded too much to produce fruit.
     
  19. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    I agree (which is why I bought 2 pairs) but 'blue velvet' has never produced for me, even when the plants were the same size. I keep both 'blue moon' trimmed tall so that I can actually get underneath/inside to harvest and the 'blue velvet' - being smaller - are planted more to the sides so the 4 plants create more of a pyramid shape....I didn't know there would be such a size difference so it just worked out that way.
     
  20. Georgia Strait

    Georgia Strait Generous Contributor

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    Good morning Saturday March 30th 2024

    the mtn snow is low on « The Lions » peaks tho the sky is dry and plenty of birdsong

    including Mr Flicker establishing his spot by hammering his beak on neighbour metal chimney cap ! (Photo w green oval)

    I heard my first nuthatch bird of 2024 yesterday too

    meanwhile here is Rhodo PJM which is cheerful and reliable partner to the billow of yellow forsythia
    - and clearly the buds survived the deep snow cold we had in Jan 24? PJM Rhodo was originally created in Maine so it is no surprise it likes this part of the coast too nr Vanc

    and is this a bumble bee ? These « bees » love PJM tho I don’t see the all-year Anna’s Hummingbirds swooping in to gather calories

    I’ve said this before - PJM has a memory trigger scent on its leaves —- vanilla? I thought yesterday it reminded me of Noxema skin cream — every grandmother medicine cabinet had that product circa 1960’s and 70’s!

    I digress - this is fritalleria progress (I posted pix a few days ago - above on thread)

    wishing everyone a peaceful springtime weekend, happy Easter / joyeuses Pacques
     

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  21. Pieter

    Pieter Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    P9800398-anenome-nemerosa.JPG Anenome nemorosa but I don't have a handle on the variety. I thought it might be 'Bowles Purple' but all the images of it online show a different colour. Possibly 'Royal Blue'.
    P9800414-iris-tuberosa.JPG Iris tuberosa
    P9800400-tulip.JPG The first of the tulips about to open! Sure sign spring's here!
    P9800428-fireisland.JPG Hosta 'Fire Island'
    P9800419-doronicum.JPG Doronicum, not sure of the species, possibly D. orientale.
    Did my best to do some gardening today but it really wasn't all that nice, just a tad on the cool side and while I did some re-potting the temperature just wasn't terribly conducive to do more...oh well, there's always tomorrow!
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2024
  22. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    I have to admit I am partial to yellow flowers and foliage especially in the springtime.
    Here are a few yellow-flowered plants that have bloomed in the past couple of weeks. (Some of my photos from this year didn't turn out too well so I have substituted older ones.)

    Harry Lauder's Walking Stick  03-2021.JPG Harry Lauder's Walking Stick (Corylus avellana 'Contorta')
    Corylopsis pauciflora 03-2021.JPG Buttercup Witch Hazel (Corylopsis pauciflora)
    2024 Mahonia acquifolium.JPG Mahonia aquifolium
    2024 February 15 - Euphorbia wulfenii self-seeded.JPG Euphorbia wulfenii (from seed)
    2024 Euphorbia x martinii 'Rudolph'.JPG Euphorbia x martinii 'Rudolph'
    2024 Helleborus seedling of 'Pam Frost'.JPG Helleborus 'Pam Frost' seedling
    2024 Tete-a-tete daffodils.JPG Tete-a-tete daffodils
    2024 Narcissus bulbicodium.JPG Narcissus bulbicodium
    Spring Gold & Orobanche.jpg Spring gold & Orobanche (Lomatium utriculatum)
    Doronicum orientale (Leopard's Bane) 2021.JPG Doronicum orientale (Leopard's Bane)
    Erythronium 'Pagoda' 2021 from Margot.JPG Erythronium 'Pagoda'
     

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  23. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    We've spent the last week ripping down our old deck and working on a replacement (some of the joists had to turned to mulch) but had to pack things up in preparation for rain so I decided to take a look around the gardens....

    IMG 2207 - red trillium aka toadshade
    IMG 2215 - shredded umbrella plant
    IMG 2217 - pasque flower
    IMG 2218 - chinese ornamental rhubarb
    IMG 2219 - western sword fern
    IMG 2224 - red barrenwort
     

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  24. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Syneilesis aconitifolia - I love the fuzzy leaves, so looked it up. Most sites said shade-loving; one said "mostly sun - mostly shade". What does that even mean? The flowers don't excite me, but one site said they're insignificant, so that would do. It's going to be hard to find when I don't let myself go to nurseries.
     
  25. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor 10 Years

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    I find they grow quite nicely in the shade but they tend to lean towards the light. Growing them in a sunny location seems the best. Flowers are interesting but small - I posted a photo July 2019; https://forums.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/threads/syneilesis-aconitifolia-shredded-umbrella-plant.95955/
     

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