2 Questions-Need feedback

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by RoseLady, May 2, 2008.

  1. RoseLady

    RoseLady Active Member

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    I have 2 unrelated questions:
    1) Pottisporum (Mock Orange) - I have 3 of these lovely plants that have been in pots for 3 years. They have gradually lightened to a very light green...almost a yellowish color and never flowered. I realized they needed to be planted in the ground or repotted, or are lacking in some nutrient (possibly iron?) I did transplant them this spring and for the first time they flowered. I planted 2 in larger pots and one in the ground. They all seem much healthier, however they are still light green in color verses the darker green color in the nurseries around town. What do you think they need? I did put a little soil sulpher in the bed and also in the new potting soil, and am hoping that will encourage a deeper darker leaf. They are flowering beautifully however. Any suggestions? They smell great!

    2) Roses- I would like some opinions on whether it is better to cut your roses after they bloom and stick them in a pretty vase or to just let them die on the stem? Which is healthier for the plant and/or encourages more blooms? They are extrememly healthy and seem to bloom in cycles. I've heard that's very normal. Also, if you do cut them back, I have heard that you should cut them down to the first 5 leaf branch. True or false? Any thoughts, suggestions, or solid answers from an expert would be welcomed.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Pittosporum (note spelling!) is not the same as Mock-orange (Philadelphus)! Can you post a photo to see which you have?
     
  3. RoseLady

    RoseLady Active Member

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    Thanks for the correction. You are correct about the spelling. it's wierd but here the nursery people call them Japanese Mock Orange. I will attach some pics. Mine look like the 2nd picture...lighter and even yellowish leaves. Below is from a web site I went to.
    I attached the link at the bottom.

    "The Japanese pittosporum's waxy white flowers add a delightful fragrance to the spring garden. Click to download a large version (800x600) of this image.
    Another common name for this plant is Japanese mockorange because the scent put forth by its blossoms is similar to that of the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). The small flowers are about 0.5 in (1.3 cm) in diameter and are held in clusters at the branch tips. They are pure white when they emerge from the bud and slowly age to a mellow creamy yellow. They appear in late spring and last for several weeks. Flowers are more noticeable and attractive on the nonvariegated plants thanks to the handsome background of dark green foliage.

    Location
    This pittosporum is native to China and Japan, but is used as an ornamental in milder climates throughout the world. In the US, Pittosporum tobira is a popular landscape item in Florida, along the Gulf Coast and throughout the Pacific Northwest.

    Culture
    Japanese pittosporum is subject to aphids and scale which tend to congregate along the midrib on the underside of leaves. This plant is very adaptable and will grow in most soils except for those that are constantly wet.
    Light: Sun to shade.
    Moisture: Moderate moisture is required for fastest growth and best looks. Established plants are able to survive long periods of drought but will look the worse for wear - will recover when adequate moisture is obtained.
    Hardiness: USDA Zones 8-10.
    Propagation: By cuttings and seeds "

    http://www.floridata.com/ref/P/pitt.cfm
     

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  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Potting soil got played out and your tobira developed a nutrient deficiency that they still haven't bounced back from. Which nutrient needs to be supplemented could be discovered by sampling your soil and having it tested. Start by asking Arizona Cooperative Extension for assistance with this.

    Summer pruning (back to the uppermost 5-leaflet leaf) of repeat-blooming roses encourages additional flowers by preventing the formation of fruits (hips). There is no advantage to undertaking this with once-blooming roses, which might otherwise give a fall hip display (the visual effectiveness of this varies with the kind of rose).
     
  5. RoseLady

    RoseLady Active Member

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    Thanks Ron B. I appreciate the input. These are all repeat bloomers with the exception of one, so I will start cutting back to the uppermost 5 leaflet leaf. Thanks for telling me what that's called! I am fairly new to roses...only about 3 years. And every year I am more and more surprised by the success of their growth. I discovered thrips this year and through this forum and help from a local nursery was able to discover the cure. All is well here in sunny Arizona!! Soon it will be too hot to care!

    The mause colored rose in these pics was covered with thrips and as you can see recovered nicely. The buds and blooms looked HORRIBLE...like the edges had been burned.
     

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