2 different plants

Discussion in 'Plants and Biodiversity Stumpers' started by Chungii V, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Okay 2 different plants, yet 1 thing in common. Names and what they share if possible.
     

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  2. Lila Pereszke

    Lila Pereszke Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi!

    Hm... 1. Euphorbia sp.?
     
  3. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    2 looks like the lovely, orderly grex of a slime mold.

    The two are symbiotic with fungus? The euphorb in its soils, and the slime mould in its structure?
     
  5. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    No mold relation in either structure.
    I don't want to give away too much just yet but one is more common than the other.
     
  6. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    they both remind me strongly of seaweeds, but that is a very long shot, since they both appear to be on dry land.
     
  7. Lila Pereszke

    Lila Pereszke Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Yuhuhu!!! E. lactea f. cristata? :)
     
  8. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Yes Lila now part 2. The second is as far off a Euphorbia as one could imagine (it is a land plant). But now the first has been Identified it may help.
     
  9. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    All right here's the full photo - It's a part of a plant. The Euphorbia you'll find in collections the other is less common of an occurrence.
     

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  10. randalm

    randalm Member

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    Just a guess: the second image looks like a rotting, fruiting spadix of an Aroid.
     
  11. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Fruiting spadix....... hmmmmm not aroid, nearly there though.
     
  12. Blake09

    Blake09 Active Member

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    cold it be close to a seed pod?
     
  13. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Seed and spadix, but not an aroid, between the two of you you nearly have it.
     
  14. Lila Pereszke

    Lila Pereszke Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A crazy mutant palm tree??? :)
     
  15. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    That's good enough for me. It's the spadix of Chrysalidocarpus lutescens (Golden Cane Palm) and a Euphorbia lactea cristata their thing in common is their mutation or crestation.
    I spent a few years in a palm nursery and don't remember seeing one do this before. Crestation like this occurs when the growing tip becomes damaged by disease or insect attack resulting in the growing tissue to become deformed. The single growth tip is lost and becomes a line of growth causing the fanned shape. Some of these, like the Euphorbia, are easily propagated and have become part of collections.
    It's reasonably common in succulents and some cacti but I have also seen it on Hibiscus, Xanthostemon and the likes of Celosia and Salvia to mention a few.
    I thought the textured look of the spadix was pretty cool and had to share it, but had to take advantage of it's uniqueness by posting it here. I'll put final photos of mutant and normal versions of each for you.
    Good one Lila :}
     

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