Identification: 10 cm Organ gilless cap

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by jfavaro, Aug 13, 2012.

  1. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    I found this on a hike on the weekend. What type of fungus is this? It's HUGE.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    Re: Fungi identification: 10 cm Organ gilless cap

    The genus is Leccinum. Not sure about the species, that would largely depend on the tree it was growing with.
     
  3. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Re: Fungi identification: 10 cm Organ gilless cap

    Thank you. Is this poisonous? Is there any commercial value?
     
  4. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Re: Fungi identification: 10 cm Organ gilless cap

    I think I answered my own question. Thank you for your help.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leccinum

    As food: They have generally been presumed to be edible for the most part, but there are reports of poisoning after eating as yet unidentified members of the genus in North America, even after thorough cooking. The orange- to red-capped species, including L. insigne, are suspected. Species of Leccinum often cause nausea when consumed raw.[3
     
  5. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    Re: Fungi identification: 10 cm Organ gilless cap

    exactly. and i'm one who got really sick from them once - but man, it really tasted good.
     
  6. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    LOL. What an endorsement!!! A great tasting toxin.
     
  7. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    And it was under birch trees.
     
  8. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    97
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    It looks like Leccinum aurantiacum to me. Is the spore print olive colour?
     
  9. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Re: 10 cm Orange gilless cap

    I am not sure of the spore print colour. I can check that next time I go on a hike in this area. How do I go about that? Put a white paper under the cap and leave for the night? Thanks for your fast response. I only took 2 mycology courses in my undergrad and what I learned was....amateurs shouldn't eat wild mushrooms.

    Jim
     
  10. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    I am so impressed with this forum. I will take more pictures on my walks because I see so many fungi species and have always wondered what their Genus / species.
     
  11. jfavaro

    jfavaro Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Do these mushrooms have any commercial value? Doesn't sound like it....
     
  12. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

    Messages:
    719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Denver
    no, they have no commercial value. Which is good, IMHO, because mycologists are still unsure about the poisonous variety.
     
  13. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    97
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    Re: 10 cm Orange gilless cap

    Yes. But, if you expect the spore print white use coloured paper. Brown paper bag will do the job.
     
  14. sabetts

    sabetts Active Member

    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    You can place the cap on a glass plate. Then hold it against any paper you like to determine color.
     

Share This Page