Winter stumper from south of the equator.

Discussion in 'Plants and Biodiversity Stumpers' started by lorax, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Wendy's recent fuzzy stumper made me think of this forum again! So I figured I'd present you with something edible, that only appears during my winter.

    Best of luck!
     

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  2. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    GACK! Edible...? By braver individuals than myself! Stronger-stomached, anyhow.
    Well, I know this ain't it, but it reminds me of Xylaria polymorpha, 'Dead Man's Fingers'.
     
  3. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Absolutely edible, and quite tasty to boot (although bitter if you don't add a bit of sugar...) Of course, if I showed you a whole one it would be a dead giveaway, and I think the ones that grow here are darker than the ones that grow in other countries.

    And it's from a member of the Magnoliophyta, not the Fungi.
     
  4. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    Liliaceae?
     
  5. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    +1 my guess too
     
  6. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Nope, not even close. It's a Dicot.
     
  7. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    Hmmm....does it narrow down to Annonaceae, at least?
     
  8. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Nope. The family is much larger and more cosmopolitan than the Annonaceae.
     
  9. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Rosaceae?
     
  10. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Nope, but getting closer. This family has representatives on every continent except Antarctica (if memory serves), and the particular genus shown in the photo has in excess of 300 members. The particular species is a shrub, and what's shown in the picture isn't the only useful part of the plant.
     
  11. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Fabaceae?
     
  12. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Violaceae?
     
  13. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Neither.
     
  14. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    OK, sounds like y'all need a hint. Here you go: the fruit (and yes, it's a fruit) shown in the photo above is used in the preparation of a tasty beverage.
     
  15. Sea Witch

    Sea Witch Active Member

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    Lauraceae!?!
     
  16. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    Theobroma cacao?
     
  17. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Togata is now in the right family, but not nearly the right genus. (Plus, I've already done a cacao stumper....)
     
  18. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    Cola...?
    Hibiscus sabdariffa?
     
  19. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Ding ding ding!

    It is indeed Hibiscus sabdariffa, AKA Roselle or Flor de Jamaica, and more specifically fresh bracts and fruits. Here's the whole photo from whence the stumper was extracted. This is the actual colour of those fruits - as I mentioned above, Ecuador's production seems to be a great deal darker than that of other countries.
     

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  20. togata57

    togata57 Rising Contributor

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    Whoo-hoo! :-)

    These look like finials from a wrought-iron fence.

    Have been assuming that these are dried fruits...are they in fact fresh ones...?!

    Wonder why the Ecuadorian ones are darker than ones from other areas. ???? What evolutionary influence is here evidenced?
    Hmm. Perhaps a response to all the volcanic ash!
     

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