What's wrong with my Adenium Plant?

Discussion in 'Caudiciforms and Pachycaul Trees' started by HK77, Nov 29, 2008.

  1. HK77

    HK77 Active Member

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    Hi all,
    I'm very very new to Adenium Growing. One week ago, I first bought an Adenium plant with all the green leaves and full of flower buds in the whole tree. But 1-2 days after reaching my house, some of the leaves started to drops and some leaves have many black spots over them. So, I thought it must be fungus and so I spray fungicidal spray once 3-4 days and the amount of leaves fall seemed to reduce but the black spots are still spreading to new leaves and new leaves are also falling.

    Now, the flowers are blooming but as you can see in the attached pictures, they are not so beautiful or potent. They can't bloom upright and they looked like impotent or weak or lacking something which I don't know. But as you can see in the last 2 attached images, not all of the flowers are that bad and you can see some good flowers.

    Regarding watering, I water only once a day and just water to wet the media and not very very much. I'm living in tropical country and now is the start of the winter time. Our country only has three seasons (Hot Seasin, Rainy Season & Cold Season-Winter). Temperature is 28-32C in day time and 19-22C in night time. Till Today, the plant get about 3 hour direct sunlight. Today I moved it to a place where it can get about 5 hour direct sunlight (10am - 3 pm). Please suggest me what's wrong with my plant. I really love this plant and dont' want to see it dying or in a condition like this now.

    Thanks You all,
    HK77
     

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  2. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    I don't think I am not going to much help but I am amazed at the fact that there are so many grafts on the one plant!
    I grow these guys from seed and although I've seen grafted Adenium before I've never seen them multi-grafted.
    They love a warm sunny spot where the morning sun hits them and keeps them in full sun til at least Midday (at home the ones that get the most sun do best). Try avoid watering foliage and flowers as sitting water can damage and spread disease. Water early in the morning, maybe reduce watering a little to every 2nd or 3rd day. I have found they do better if left to dry out somewhat between waterings rather than keeping constantly wet.. this will be determined by your mix. Make sure it's a free draining mix as water retention will lead to rot problems.
     
  3. HK77

    HK77 Active Member

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    Hi All,
    Why very few replies to my thread? Sorry for anything if i was wrong or too stupid in asking so many questions. But I'm really obssessed with my plant these days and qutie unhappy to see it in this way. Next question is "When some of the leavese become quite yellow enough and sure that it will drop in 2-3 days, IS it better to remove it earlier so that plant can give nutrition more to other remaining healthy Plants???". Till today, I remove those yellowish leaves from the plant by slightly pulling them and they remove with ease. If it's wrong, please suggest me.

    Thanks,
    HK77
     
  4. markinwestmich

    markinwestmich Active Member

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    I have had this issue with my Adenium multiflorum when the roots have been wet for too long. I believe it is a fungal infection, or at least, a sign that it has been too wet for too long. In my experience with this one particular plant, twice it has been self-limiting, as soon as it is allowed to dry out and the effected leaves have dropped, the new growth comes in healthy. I have not treated it with any chemicals. I live in a very different climate than you, therefore all I can recommend is to restrict the water, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings.

    I do know that in my readings on the various Adenium nursery websites, those that are in India and Thailand will loose a certain percentage of their plant stock during the rainy season. The soil mix they tend to use is very rich in organics, which is good for rapid growth, but if it is kept wet for too long, then it encourages fungus growth and ultimately rot in the plant.

    I did notice from one of your photos that your soil mix appears to be just that, soil. If it has been recently repotted, then that alone may be the source of your problem. The plant may simply be reacting to it's new environment, and/or your soil mix is made up of too fine of particles. As mentioned above in a previous post, the soil mix for these plants must be very loose, large particles, and the water must drain quickly out the bottom of your container. Better to have it drain and dry out quickly than have it's roots sit in wet soil.

    Mark

    In addition, since you are entering your Winter season, your Adenium will likely enter it's dormant period. During this time, water when dry. It may begin to drop flowers and some of it's foliage, as well. Depending upon the specific species, it may, in fact, drop all of it's foliage (not all species do this). Do not worry, as usually in March, it will begin to bud out with new flowers and foliage. So, do not attempt to give it too much attention and intervention, as it might not respond, given the time of year.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2008
  5. HK77

    HK77 Active Member

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    OK Mark,
    Thanks for your reply. I think I have a wrong timing in buying the adenium!!! As this is the only and first adenium in my house, I watch it about 5-8 times a day, thinking what I can do for it. Why only my plant is like this and why other peoples plants are so blooming!!! May be I'm a little bit obsessed. I think I just leave it like it is and give it some time.

    Thanks,
    HK77
     
  6. markinwestmich

    markinwestmich Active Member

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    Adeniums are some of the most beautiful caudiciform plants, and some of the best specimens are grown in your area of the world. I have seven of them, all of different species (or at least those representative of the different regions of the world where they grow naturally.)

    You did not obtain your plant at the wrong time of the year. As you said, you are new to Adeniums.

    If you look above in our Photo Gallery and click onto Adeniums/Desert Roses, you will find a few culture guides to get you started.

    Mark
     
  7. HK77

    HK77 Active Member

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    Thanks Mark,
    Yes, you may be right. After reading a lot on the internet, I think I have a luxury of good weather for Adenium to grow. Day temperature about 30-42C at direct sun light area and night temperature about 20-25C even at the cold season (winter). During summer, Day temperature about 40-45C and night temperature about 30-35C. Only the rainy season is the only season I'll have big prolbem with my adenium, I think.
    One thing I want to know is "At this temperature range of winter in my country, Will my adeniums still go dormant in winter????" Now, I'm thinking everyday whether to water my plant or not. As drought can also cause leaf drops and less flowering, right? Over the whole internet, every adeniums growers suggest not to water during winter as the plants go dormant. But the temperature range is quite different here from them and so, I really need to know whether the plant will still go dormant in my winter. Sorry for many questions but you really are a great help.

    Thanks,
    HK77
     
  8. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    I holiday a bit in Bali and can tell you that just their weather alone dumps loads of water on these lovelies. Just stick with the allowing them to dry a little between waterings. They DO NOT like to be permanently wet. Again this will be determined by your soil / mix. It's important to have free draining soil if you water regularly. I add 1/4 river sand to my mix and find that will hold moisture without compromising drainage. I water 2-3 times a week as needed. I have summer temps around 35C 20C at night and winter around 25C and night minimum 15C. They do slow down a little but I take 1 day of watering off and drop to once or twice a week in winter. Fertilise every month to compensate for nutrients lost through watering. Use a fertiliser that has a decent potassium level to help produce healthy flowers.
     
  9. markinwestmich

    markinwestmich Active Member

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    Nearly every plant that flowers will need a time to rest. Adeniums in their natural, arid-climate environment do have a dormant period, or at least a period when flowering stops and new growth slows significantly. Old foliage, at this time, may drop. Most Adeniums, as you probably know, are found near the equator, in and around Africa and the Middle East...typically warm temperatures year round. Although rest periods, in most plants, are triggered by seasonal changes in light and/or temperature, I am uncertain what those triggers are for Adeniums, but they are predictable. In the northern hemisphere, growers across North America, Europe, etc. will typically have their Adeniums rest between December and March.

    A good general guideline for watering Adeniums would suggest treating them like a cactus during their rest/dormant period and like a tropical during the summer growing season. Spring and Fall transition periods take a little more attention. From Fall through Spring, water when dry. This does not mean wait until there are signs/symptoms of dehydration, but rather pay attention to how fast the soil dries, then give it a little water when it does. Do not soak it like you would during the summer.
     
  10. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Just a little add on here: if you have a position in your yard that has very steady unvarying temperatures the plants do not have obvious dormancy periods. Yes the flowering will slow down to spot flowering and growth rate is slowed and there is leaf fall but I could not call this a fully dormant period. I use winter time to harden off last year's seedlings because they are at a good size and not desperately in need of constant attention at that time of year at their 'semi-dormant' state.
    My Pachypodium in exact same conditions (Soil, Sun, Fertiliser, Positioning etc.) will drop every leaf and literally stop growing (That's were I nearly lost the one in my other thread) as with some other cacti and succulent (My Discorea do the same but at opposite times of year). They will suffer if continuously watered through this period.
    The Adenium however still need a regular watering in this period, but as I stated earlier reduce to suit soil. If you were to have a definite dormancy where the plant shuts down totally then seriously reduce watering but I have found that sticking with the simple let the mix dry between waterings you will maintain a healthy plant that will flourish as soon as the 'dormancy' or 'slowed' period finishes.
    As Mark says by letting them dry doesn't mean let them wilt and become distressed, but it's impossible to say do it every 2nd day now and then every 4th next month because it still comes down to soil type and quality and your weather conditions.
    I first started planting my cacti and succulents in a very heavy sandy mix because that's what most books recommended. I now use about 3/4+ quality potting mix and -1/4 riversand. This blend will retain moisture without restricting drainage. My earlier mixes are absolutely shocking, so much sand that I'm surprised anything even grew let alone survived (I still have a few pots that have been there for years) but because of my watering technique, which seems to kill touchy, sensitive plants seemed to be what saved these plants and led into my love of especially the Adenium and Pachypodium.
     
  11. HK77

    HK77 Active Member

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    Thank you All,
    You all are really helpful. Today, I move my adenium plant to the top of the roof where the sun hits directly from 8 a.m to 4 pm and temperature is steady at 42-46C the whole day but night temperature will be around 20-25C. I can say that day and night temperature difference will be huge but I believe the soil which I watered this morning, will be almost dry tomorrow morning and so I can water my plant every day or every other day. I've already put some slow release 14-14-14 pellets into the pot and I plan to give it liquid fertilizer 21-21-21 every week. With this intense amount of sun and light the whole day. I think my plant will have no problem with my intended watering regime and fertilizing regime, right? Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    The next big problem with me now is "Watering". Everyone over the internet sugguested to water till some of water come out from bottem (Irrigation). Today, I tried to water so much so that some can come out of the bottem but nothing come out and I dare not add more water as I'm afraid I kill my plant in one day. Now, it's 4:30 pm here and the soil is half dry. Do you guys think I add more water tomorrow till some water come out????

    Thanks Guys,
    HK77
     
  12. markinwestmich

    markinwestmich Active Member

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    Watering is a little bit of science, a little bit of art, and a little bit of just knowing your plant. There are so many variables that go into how much and when to water properly. The key points are to: (1) Until you really know your plant, pay attention to it. Plants that have seasonal changes in their behavior are often a challenge. (2) Watering techniques, as has been discussed above, will vary whether it is in an active growing period or a rest period. Adeniums are certainly one of those plants. (3) Fully soaking the soil is an excellent way of washing out fertilizer salts and trapped gases in the soil, however, this is a technique that is best tolerated during the active growing season. Once water uptake slows down, then this is not a technique that I would recommend.

    So, getting back to your original question...If it appears that the plant is still wants to flower, then it has not entered it's rest period, so you can likely water the plant even though the soil has not completely dried. Rot in Adeniums occur when the organic material in the soil has been wet for days, especially if the soil mix is too fine. If your temperatures are warm enough to cause rapid evaporation in your container, then you will have to water more frequently. If the soil is kept wet, though, it will encourage soil fungi. Even during the active growing season, I still have to watch the plant and allow for the soil to dry out a bit before watering again. One sign that I am watering too much is the presence of fungus gnats in and around the soil. This is often followed by yellow, spotted foliage, leaf drop, and I have lost the tips of a few branches. I've made my own mistakes.
     
  13. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Yes, if only I knew then what I know now. Keep at it Adenium are pretty plants.
    If you are pouring a lot of water into the pot but it's not running out freely then there is a definite drainage issue. Your pot being Terracota will draw some moisture out of the mix so your mix will probably dry out reasonably quick but not so much if it's a heavy, fine sand.
     
  14. tacapollo

    tacapollo New Member

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    No one has answered the black spot question. Is it a fungus like in other plants?
    I just received my desert rose bare-root through the mail and most of the older leaves have black spot on the underside of the leaves and along the tips only on top.
    Should I remove all these leaves to preven it from spreading or just plant it and control the watering and such?
    Thanks,

    Terry
     

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