What would happen to a deciduous plant if...

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Junglekeeper, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    temperatures remain warm so as to cause the plant to not shed its leaves?

    I have a trifoliate orange tree that is normally exposed to cold temperatures during the change in seasons. Doing so causes the tree to shed its leaves, as expected. However it is currently growing indoors and the leaves show no sign of yellowing. What would happen if I continue to over-winter it in a warm environment? Will there be a detrimental effect?
     
  2. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Speaking with no knowledge here, but I have often read descriptions on certain deciduous plants saying they are evergreen in warmer locations. I don't think it's a problem. It will still lose some leaves - evergreen doesn't mean that individual leaves stay on forever, only that the old leaves are shed gradually and the plant doesn't go bare.
     
  3. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    Down here, it happens often enough with no detriment to the plant. What usually happens is you'll see some signs of senescence, like a bit of yellowing or drying or stiffening texture as new buds burst forth. Then the old leaves mostly drop as the new leaves come on. Quercus, Acer, Lagerstroemia, Celtis, and Magnolia all have species that are deciduous but will retain leaves here throughout mild years. The ubiquitously green live oaks and magnolias will all shed oldest leaves as new ones come on. It's a quite noticeable leaf fall when this happens. You'll get drifts of pollen and falling leaves simultaneously.
     
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  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks for the replies. It's reassuring to know that nothing bad will happen, to this particular plant anyway.
     
  5. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member

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    I assume that you are not trying to grow any fruit from this tree. Fruiting can be affected by insufficient winter chill hours.
     
  6. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Contributor 10 Years

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    True but that's not a concern with this plant. In any case the fruit is pretty much inedible anyway.
     

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