Identification: What oak? Rounded lobes, leaves not tapered to petiole

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by wcutler, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    We don't know if this tree was planted on this property on Samish Island, WA or if it's native here. Leaves are tough, shiny, around 13cm long with around 5-7 rounded lobes each side (my friend thought the leaf length and number of lobes ruled out Q. garryana), sinuses less than half the width of the leaf, petioles around 2cm (rules out Quercus robur), leaf bases sort-of auricular rather than being tapered to the petioles (rules out everything I know). Light green or glaucous leaf backs are not at all downy, and there are no obvious hairs at this point. It's a large tree that I didn't remember to deliberately photograph - it's the large one behind the Liriodendron.
    Quercus_SamishIslandWA_Cutler_20170908_135553.jpg Quercus_SamishIslandWA_Cutler_20170908_144701.jpg Quercus_SamishIslandWA_Cutler_20170908_144713.jpg Quercus_SamishIslandWA_Cutler_20170908_145109.jpg Quercus_SamishIslandWA_Cutler_20170908_145146.jpg
     
  2. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    I don't know, but I'd start with any of the white oaks. Starting with Quercus alba. ISU Forestry Extension - Tree Identification: White Oak (Quercus alba)
    This site has a couple of other white oak family trees hyperlinked.
    From a foraging standpoint re utility and edibility, knowing white oak family from red oak family is relatively important. Higher tannins in the pointed lobed leaf oaks.
     
  3. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks, thanrose. I was looking under white oaks, haven't found a convincing match. A friend has sent a closer photo of the tree.
    Quercus_SamishIslandWA_DebJones_20170908_IvyPull.jpg
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    What about Quercus petraea, Durmast Oak? I read something about hairiness of the main veins yesterday that made me rule it out, but that seems to just be when the leaves open. (From Johnson & More, Collins Tree Guide, Harper Collins, 2004, p. 214). Or I see that there is Q. petraea x robur. I'm looking at photos on a Czech Botanicka Fotogalerie page named Q. robur var. puberula. Or this Hortus Camdenensis | Quercus robur L. var. sessiliflora page where it is called Q. robur var. sessiliflora, with Q. petraea given as a synonym. The sinuses seem to have the right amount of shallowness and the one acorn in my photo is appropriately sessile.

    The people who built the cabin were Swedish; maybe they brought seeds?
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'm wondering about a hybrid between Pedunculate Oak and Garry Oak?
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Thanks, Michael. I have no idea what that would look like or how I'd know.

    I have a little more info on this, though. It was planted, probably around 1970 as a gift, was about the height of the people who planted it at the time. The son of the owner says that on his property a short distance away, he has an older tree of the same type that was planted in the 1940's. He said "it is called a European Oak". That would make it Quercus petraea.

    I'll see if I can get him to send me acorn photos.
     

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