trumpet vine

Discussion in 'Vines and Climbers' started by jar, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Location:
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    The yellow trumpet is a Campsis. It's not the same as Morning Glory which you'll have to work on diligently to get rid of. If you want an evergreen vine, try Holboellia coriacea - it's fragrant, or even some of the Clematis montana varieties.
     
  2. Ellen S

    Ellen S Member

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    Ridgefield, WA
    Here in SW Washington I've been battling a trumpet vine (Campsis radicans) for three years. I had the main trunk (!) removed and then spent 2 years working away at the shoots that came (and still come) up from the roots that radiate out from where the main plant was. I worked away with Roundup, but that only seemed to encourage Ms Campsis to push onward and upward. Last year I switched to Crossbow, which works better. I have dedicated a large chunk of my garden to Ms Campsis, so that she can pop up and be zapped without my having to protect other plants. So far so good, although that space looks really terrible. Digging up the roots is futile in our heavy clay soil, because they are about 2 ft down and so brittle that they break easily. Every little piece will grow a new plant... I cannot imagine anywhere that would be appropriate for a trumpet vine. It is surprising that nurseries here even sell them.
     
  3. Goldylox

    Goldylox Member

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    Millsboro, DE USA
    Re: trumpet vine & getting rid of it

    Newt,

    I read your story about the Trumpet Vine / Hummingbird vine... I too have a SERIOUS problem with this vine..... I planted it in a flower bed on a trellis, well, I have since that year ( 2002 ) until now, been trying to get it out of that garden..... It started coming up everywhere and including covering that trellis before summer was over....

    My Husband finally roto-tilled the entire garden after I removed the things I really wanted to keep ( they are all in big pots, or have been moved to another part of the yard )....... Not sure what to do next...... We've pulled, cut, hacked, and chopped everything we can see with the eye, but I just know it's still there somewhere, & as soon as I go to put my favorites back in the garden it will come back....

    So, I've decided to spray it all with round up after taking down the retaining wall we've built.... I don't think I should speak now, but it has never gotten out of the retaining wall and into the grassy yard, is that still possible?

    Will the Round up work now that the entire garden is fresh dirt about 2 -3 feet deep? If you could help me out, or if anyone out there can offer your advice, I would GREATLY appreciate it....

    Thanks so much in advance........
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2008
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    Round-Up is a foliar application spray - to be effective with it you need to wait a bit for it to regenerate and then hit all the leaves. This way, it will work; on bare dirt your chances are 50-50 or less.

    You can try making your soils acidic as a method of discouragement - hit with vinegar. You will, once this has finished working (aboot a week) have to re-amend with soda or lime, something to bring your soil's pH back up. But this may not work against Trumpet vine - I've never actually had success with it, except with Round-Up on the leaves.

    Best of luck!
     
  5. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    I have never heard of campsis being invasive or of its self seeding

    I planted one several years ago and another one a few years back.

    The first one finally reached a decent size last year. Over the winter it looks dead: the branches are brittle light-tan sticks. But it started to leaf out about a week ago and now is growing well.

    It has never spread, by seeds or by any other mechanism.

    I have always understood that it is a prized vine. It is highly recommended in every book that I have ever read, and the plant stores speak highly of it. I am certainly happy with mine. Only problem is that it grows so much more slowly than almost every other plant.

    It grows on the fence between my place and my neighbour's - more on her side than mine - and has not produced any shoots or whatever in her yard.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2008
  6. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Soccerdad, it takes about 10 to 15 years before you will see it popping up in the yard from the root system.

    Newt
     
  7. soccerdad

    soccerdad Active Member 10 Years

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    If all goes well, I will be dead by then.
     
  8. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Goldylox, you may find that the roots of the trumpet vine were cut up when the area was tilled. Small bits can sprout after about a year. When you see the sprouts you can either try and dig down to see how extensive the root system has become or do the soaking method I described.

    Newt
     
  9. Goldylox

    Goldylox Member

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    Location:
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    Hello once again,

    Newt,

    I have had the soil grated and ready to re-plant, I did not spray it with round up because I wanted to plant right away......... Is it ok to start, or should I spray it with round up and wait the alotted amount of days? I understand the way to get rid of the new growth.......

    Thanks for your help......
     
  10. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Goldylox, are you asking if you should spray the soil with RoundUp? That's a 'no, no'. You only spray the leaves of the plants. NEVER pour or spray RoundUp on the soil.

    Newt
     
  11. Goldylox

    Goldylox Member

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    Thanks Newt,

    That's just what I was asking......... I figured it would kill off anything in there....... I'm sure glad I asked first.....
     
  12. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Goldylox, you are very welcome!

    Newt
     
  13. violetrash

    violetrash Member

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    Location:
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    I know what you mean about morning glory. I live in Vancouver and it grows everywhere here. When I lived in Prince George I used to plant morning glories every year, but they died over the winter...... thank goodness. They have such a beautiful flower...it's too bad they are such a pain. I planted a yellow trumpet vine this spring. By accident I planted it in the perfect spot. It can't invade the neighbors' yard and it can grow as much as it wants along my fence.
     
  14. Taya H

    Taya H New Member

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    Location:
    Binbrook ON Canada
    In my previous yard, there was a yellow trumpet vine. I moved it successfully, but shoots kept coming up where it previously grew. So I am well aware of how invasive and stubborn it can be. However the beauty of this vine, as well as the lure it has for hummers, which I adore, has me thinking to plant another one, here in my new place.

    Which leads me to think that if I grow it in a huge earthenware pot, dug down a little into the garden to anchor it, should really do the trick, yes? Or will the roots find their way through the pot and end up breaking it and still escaping? Or should I use a "hole-less" plastic pot. Would that do the trick? Just putting the questions out there.

    Or should I consider another fast-climbing flowering plant that works just as well and attracts the hummers too? Suggestions?
     

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