Tropical Hibiscus

Discussion in 'Hibiscus' started by kkprincell, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. kkprincell

    kkprincell Member

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    I have several tropical hbiscus that I keep in containers as I live in Southern Ohio so I can bring them in for the winter months. They seem to do very well, but as they keep getting bigger, I keep repotting them and the are getting quite heavy and difficult to bring in. Should I prune back the roots periodically to keep them contained or should I consider letting them die out? Should I cut them way back now that I have brought them in for the winter? And if so how far should I cut them without harming them.
     
  2. mikeyinfla

    mikeyinfla Active Member

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    i have never grown hibiscus inside for very long just a few seedlings thru winter. for the big ones i live in florida so no need to. i would say get cuttings going of the ones you have than you can move the smaller ones around easier. you could try the root prunning i would say get the cuttings going good before you do the prunning of the roots some of the tropical hibiscus are really hardy and can take allot of punishment but some are not as strong so will not take well to the root prunning. at least if you have cuttings going its not a total lose if the plants donot make it thru the root prunning
     
  3. kkprincell

    kkprincell Member

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    What about cutting them back? Some people tell me it is safe to cut them way back. I experimented on one this fall, but am afraid on some of my larger ones as I don't ant to kill them.
     
  4. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    I've had Hibiscus rosa-sinensis freeze to the ground and grow back to man height in just one summer from canes that had a small amount of mulch covering.

    I've pruned them to less than a foot tall before, too. When I've grown from cuttings, I cut all the leaves by 2/3 reduction or more, removing the leaves on the bottom entirely. I find it very easy to grow and propagate.

    I can't imagine pruning yours would do more damage than a freeze did here.
     
  5. kkprincell

    kkprincell Member

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    How do you do these cuttings that someone else mention. I don't know what that means, really.
    Thanks,
    Kristi
     
  6. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    I just keep pieces that I've pruned, anywhere from six inches to a foot long, 15-30 cm. I'll also do it anytime of year, but late winter is probably the best time when they are about ready for spring growth.

    Cut off all the lower leaves as close to the stem as possible. Cut all the leaves back by two thirds. Pinch off any flower buds to conserve energy for root growth. You can dust the ends with rooting hormone or soak them in willow water, then stick in potting soil and water them. Pop a cloche over them or tent with plastic wrap, keep out of direct sun. Usually a few leaves will yellow and fall, but there will always be some green at the top. By the time you see new green leaves sprouting, there will be some root growth. Not necessarily enough to transplant at that time, though.
     
  7. kkprincell

    kkprincell Member

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    Thanks so much! I will give this a try!
    Kristi
     
  8. mikeyinfla

    mikeyinfla Active Member

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    they would freeze all the way to the roots in ohio even planted in the ground
     
  9. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    Of course, but since KK keeps them in pots and brings them in for the winter, that won't be a problem. You and I don't worry about it much, but Zone 8 and colder sure would.
     
  10. jazzy1

    jazzy1 Member

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    Do not use any cuttings that have blooms.

    jazzy1
     

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