Trees with non-invasive roots

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by Bonnielass, Dec 10, 2009.

  1. Bonnielass

    Bonnielass Member

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    I think it's wise to worry about invasive roots. I live in a townhouse complex and we are having to spend thousands of dollars to cut down trees with roots that are destroying our driveways and sidewalks and eventually replant trees with non-invasive roots. I'm still in the research phase. If anyone has any ideas, PLEASE let us know.
    Thanks!
     
  2. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    Re: Shade trees with noninvasive root system

    Shallow roots are usually the problem with driveways and sidewalks....In a litigation society, the trees are going to suffer.

    Oaks typically have the deeper, less 'invasive' roots you desire. Contrary to popular belief, there are lots of fast growing oaks.
     
  3. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Re: Shade trees with noninvasive root system

    May another option be tall perrenial grasses, such Arundo donax in a controlled plot?Cut back in the winter?
    What about Aralia which is rampant in growth to 9-10 metres?(35 feet) tall.....
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Renowned Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years of Activity

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    (moved to its own thread)
     
  5. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Stay away from some flowering cherry varieties. They don't always surface or shallow root, but are notorious in this area. I saw one two weeks ago with a root bigger than the trunk. Now I need to figure out where it was so I can go back for a photo.

    As a general rule, it seems that the smaller the tree, the less invasive the roots.

    I've seen few problems with vine maple, Japanese maple, Stewartia and other trees of that size.

    I suppose you are probably keeping root barrier panels in mind for this fact gathering, because they expand the possibilities quite a bit.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    The problem with Japanese flowering cherries is grafting them onto sweet cherry. It is not the Japanese flowering cherry that is producing the thick, superficial roots. Japanese flowering cherries raised from seed, grown from cuttings and probably grafted onto Gisela rootstock as well are not expected to present this problem.
     

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