transplanting older kiwi vine

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Lilly3, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. Lilly3

    Lilly3 Member

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    Can a large older Kiwi vine be transplanted in zone 3, in the same city. If so , how wide would I expect the roots to go, or how deep .
    The branches span about 10 feet across in a bush type. It sounds overgrown.
     
  2. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    I don't see why not. You probably should cut back the top growth to be able to handle it easily. Try to get as much root as possible, and disturb the soil around the roots as little as possible. There are techniques to doing this properly, such as digging a circular trench around the plant roots, burlapping and tieing around the circle, and then digging under the plant to roll on its side so the bottom can be burlapped and tied as well. Don't dig anymore than you or your friends can lift, unless you have a tractor or something to lift it:)

    The plant will probably be in shock for a few weeks before it resumes growing. This should be done in the spring.

    The roots have probably spread as much as the above ground portion. You will never get them all and will have to cut the roots to a manageable size.
     
  3. vitog

    vitog Well-Known Member

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    If you can wait until next Fall, it's much easier and more satisfactory to ground layer an arm of the vine and then transplant the layer during the dormant season.
     
  4. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    Or you could leave the old girl in place to live out her life and buy another Kiwi. That would probably be the easiest...Make sure you get a male and female or you won't get fruit on most varieties.
     
  5. Lilly3

    Lilly3 Member

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    Thank you for your advise, I shall try to get a few if it is a clump. An older couple has it in their yard and it is unmanagable for them. The fruit attract bears if left unpicked to fall. Her hubby just had a triple bypass surgery so I said I could help. I'll prune it first, let it recover a week or so, then decide how to move it (burlap sounds good) I used to work reception at a nursery so I have seen this done. Root balling. My plum tree has been pruned ready to be an arbour for it, as well as a 4x4 post rose arbour I am going to put morning glory onto as well. Until the Kiwi takes over. There are two plums side by side,so I could put two there.

    There are most likely alot of suckers, if they propagate this way. I haven't been there to see it yet. I'm hoping I can start a few.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 8, 2011
  6. Lilly3

    Lilly3 Member

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    An update on the transplant, I did in the spring. there were two fifteen foot tall vines (KIWI) tangled together and clinging to a cable leading into the house by a window. I pruned it loose, and made it a movable size. DUG, soaked , pried, DUG soaked, pried and soaked some more,. then got two men to help pry. We finally got the two vines out. Two weeks after replanting them here the leaf buds opened up. They are now doing very well with large leaves in allot more places. No flowers this year though, it is now Sept. It will probably go back to producing next year. We had a slow, cool spring, and not much heat this summer. It has finally gotten hot the past two weeks. Just ripening tomatoes.
     

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