tiny purple flower id

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by roxturpin, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. roxturpin

    roxturpin Member

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    this year a bunch of tiny purple flowers popped up in my garden... I've lived here 3 years and they never bloomed before...i've attached a picture- sorry, it's from my cell phone...
    can you tell me what it is? 0311081401-02.jpg
     
  2. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Violet. They can be pretty invasive but I love them.
    Margaret
     
  3. roxturpin

    roxturpin Member

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    Thanks Margaret! They're really pretty and growing in a place nothing's ever grown before! So it's a good thing.
     
  4. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    yes, violets. very, very pretty flower - and they're one of the first to bloom in the spring. yes, some consider them invasive. i like them and i encourage them (and the wild strawberry) to grow in my flowerbeds...nothing like using nature, itself, to provide :)

    they make great ground cover and really do keep the weeds down and it saves on the cost of mulch.
     
  5. roxturpin

    roxturpin Member

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    I wonder if I can dig them up and move some?
     
  6. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor

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    I don't see why not - they're pretty tenacious.
     
  7. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    oh, yes!! i do that all the time! they transplant really well!!
     
  8. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years of Activity

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    Yes, they transplant very well and they usually also produce lots of seeds. Personally I use them in areas such as under the fig tree where bluebells, considered by some gardeners to be a weed, also grow. I really enjoy the colours and perfume after the winter and find that mowing the area in late spring allows the roses and lavender to strut their stuff and gives me easier access to the figs.
    One of the things I take pleasure in on this site are reading about all the gardening styles of contributors.
    Margaret
     

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  9. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society

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    Viola odorata ,one preferite flower of Rome antique.
     
  10. Flora Voileta

    Flora Voileta Member

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    This flower in your post looks the closest to the one I have in mind.

    It grows like clover in the grass and I think I may have thought it to be a different variety than the hairy clumpy lavender clover flower that I am now thinking of...so...

    My question is: is a Violet a flower of a variety of clover or just another plant altogether as I now suspect?

    I may have to change that line in my poem...

    (Thanks in advance for any info...I just wrote my Mom a poem for her 75th bday and Mother's Day invloving many flowers and want to get them right...)
    ~Poem shared below if anyone is interested~

    Gifts
    Orchids display their beauty
    and offer their heart in the open air
    Blooming, the iris shows you
    things that are not always there
    Lilacs present perfume,
    reminiscent of a day
    when lady slippers flourished
    as their children ran to play…
    Crocuses push forth
    the birth again of spring
    Violets~ the surprise
    that clover loves to bring
    ……Tulips open gently
    to kiss the springtime dew
    Freesia breezes joyfully
    to search the world anew…

    I want to thank you for the flowers
    that you’ve often shared with me
    So here’s a birthday harvest for you…
    all your loving family!

    @ Susan Beth Burke April 27, 2008​
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2008
  11. abgardeneer

    abgardeneer Active Member

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    Violets are not the flowers of clover. They are completely separate plant entities.
     
  12. Flora Voileta

    Flora Voileta Member

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    I was afraid of that. Thanks so much for the info. As you can see, I am more of a poet than a botanist!
     
  13. Flora Voileta

    Flora Voileta Member

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    OK, here's the corrected version. And from now on I will limit my posts to botanical questions :)

    Gifts

    Orchids display their beauty
    and offer their heart in the open air
    Blooming, the iris shows you
    things that are not always there
    Lilacs present perfume,
    reminiscent of a day
    when lady slippers flourished
    as their children ran to play…
    Crocuses push forth
    the birth again of spring
    Violets~ the surprise
    that small leaves in grasses bring
    ……Tulips open gently
    to kiss the springtime dew
    Freesia breezes joyfully
    to search the world anew…

    I want to thank you for the flowers
    that you’ve often shared with me
    So here’s a birthday harvest for you…
    all your loving family!

    @ Susan Beth Burke April 27, 2008​
     

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