Sticky stuff dripping off tulip tree is ruining my car

Discussion in 'Woody Plants' started by lucasfam, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. lucasfam

    lucasfam Member

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    What is this clear sticky substance that is raining off my tulip tree onto my car? I just moved into this house that included a large tulip tree in the front yard. It is a beautiful tree but the "sap" that seems to rain off of the tree is unbearable! My car is covered in it to the point where my doors were stuck shut. If I were to trim the branches that cover my driveway I would have to cut half of the tree off. Does it stop dripping this stuff at some point? PLEASE HELP!!!
     
  2. Raakel

    Raakel Active Member

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    Hello,

    I am almost certain that your tree is convered in tulip tree aphid. Here is a link describing aphids and how to control them. Have a close look and be sure to identify the pests as aphids before you attempt to control them.

    Raakel
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years of Activity

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    Best permanent solution is to build a car porch to keep the aphid poo (yes, that's what it is!) off
     
  4. lucasfam

    lucasfam Member

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    Raakel, Thank you so much! You were absolutely right! Aphids were abundant on almost every leaf I checked. I'm looking into the natural solutions first.

    Michael F., How Gross!!! That is a great idea also! I had been thinking about having a garage built. Thanks a bunch to both of you for your help!

    The Lucas Family
     
  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Rising Contributor 10 Years of Activity

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    You may want to consider ladybugs.
     
  6. lucasfam

    lucasfam Member

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    Thank You Junglekeeper! I read that wasps could also be used but I think I will go with the ladybugs first!
     
  7. jimweed

    jimweed Active Member

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    I spray a lot of Tulip and Linden trees from now till mid July for just that reason, and I mean alot. Safers soap works excellent, even if you can only reach up 20 feet, will make a world of difference, may take 2 treatments if your trees are dripping this early in the season. Lady bugs will get gummed up in the sticky dew. And you probably already have wasps, they will find you, and your sticky tree.
     
  8. lucasfam

    lucasfam Member

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    Thanks for the tip jimweed! I released over 4,000 ladybugs onto my tree last week and I have not noticed any results yet. Can I buy Safers soap anywhere or do I have to hire someone to spray the tree for me?
     
  9. jimweed

    jimweed Active Member

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    You can but Safer's soap at most garden centres, if its a big tree you may want to have someone spray it for you.
     
  10. Bebesmom

    Bebesmom Active Member

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    I just had to say, I loved this subject. I too had aphid honeydew raining down from some very mature birches onto a lovely brick sidewalk and rose garden. The roses looked like they'd been lacquered and the brick sidewalk had to be pressure washed each year. Finally, one birch, the one in the most strategic position, had to go. It opened up the yard (in Western WA) to sunshine and was a big improvement in the aphid-department.
     

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