Speaking of Giant Sequoias

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by dirt reaper, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Truly amazing trees!

    Planted March of 2005. The file name is the date of the photo. Enjoy.

    J

    edit -

    Photo 1 - 02/28/2008
    Photo 2 - 06/03/2006
    Photo 3 - 08/16/2006

    Once established, approx. 2 years, these suckers really take off. I have more than a few that are over 9 ft. tall!
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 12, 2011
    norain likes this.
  2. DGuertin

    DGuertin Active Member

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    Aaaand to follow up on this follow-up...

    How long are we looking at before we're actually looking at something appreciably 'a tree?' Reason I ask is that I have four wee sprouts, can't even call them seedlings, from seeds I planted in December. Cold strat, overnight soak, micro-greenhouse germination, and voila... They're now, oh, maybe 1 1/2" - 2" and don't seem to really be doing anything. They have gone from the original 3 needles they popped out with to another rank or two, quite a bit more full, still quite blue, but looking more like a weird red-stemmed flower than a tree. Have them in probably 80 - 90% shade, still in 1 1/2" liners.

    *Any* info would be greatly appreciated! Never tried to grow one of these before.
     
  3. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    In March of 2005 I planted my sequoia seedlings. These were purchased as I do not have the space, equipment, nor the expertise to produce the quantity of seedlings I required.

    The seedlings were 1-3's. That is 1 year greenhouse, 3 years outdoor farm. The seedlings were bare roots. The average size of the seedling ranged from 12' - 24'. They were certified disease free.

    You sound like you have a great start. I am wondering about the amount of sunlight your starts are getting? Everything I have read on Giant Sequios suggest that full sun is the best but I am an "extreme novice" and hope someone with far more expertise will chime in.

    I wish I would have spent more time and done a better job of documenting with photographs the entire process I went through to get my grove of Giant Sequois going.

    Best of luck!

    J
     
  4. Creeping Jenny

    Creeping Jenny Active Member

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    looks great! Gonna be a beaut!
     
  5. WadeT

    WadeT Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    Giant Sequoias won't stand a chance in East TX or most places East of the Rockies. They're basically sub-alpines, needing cool summers with low humidity. Even NE summers are far too hot and humid. Coastal Redwoods might be worth a try, however.
     
  6. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    This is the same tree. Jan, 7, 2010.

    Starting to fill out.
     

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  7. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    And in a few more years . . .
     

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  8. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    The Giant Sequoia is basically my favorite evergreen tree for urban landscaping where space permits.

    There are many nice ones in northern Oregon. Even a few along Highway 26, half way to the ocean coming from Portland. Apparently some were planted for reforestation. The spire-like tops are visible from the highway, driving to Seaside.

    Here is a photo of one next door to a yard I was working at last year.
     

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  9. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    The same tree. January 24, 2011.

    Looking very nice!
     

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    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011
  10. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    Just learned that the Giant Sequoia in the row below, in Beaverton, OR, were from seeds started in 1932.
     

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  11. norain

    norain Member

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    Re: Speaking of Giant Sequois

    from my exsperiance and im a newbie too .i killed my first batch because i fertilizing with what i thought wasnt even a trace able amount of fertilizer .from what i read everyone has told me just water .and thats what i do now i have about 200 little trees now. some ive moved into manure potting soil and this seems to be working . but i think jim is the exspert here to be asking. im still a trial annd error guy.took me a yr for my little sprouts to become little trees. 3to 4 inchs tall now.
     
  12. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Missed posting a picture last year. Here is the same tree as of Jan. 22, 2013.
     

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  13. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Young trees are so refreshing.

    That bent trunk in the background is pretty nice too.

    ...
     
  14. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    The two in the Oregon yard look like 'Glaucum' and will of course grow much too big for the space they were planted in.
     
  15. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Same tree. Picture taken 4/19/2014. Thank you for the reminder.

    I thought the bent trunk made a nice visual reference.
     

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  16. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Probably in 200 years.

    But I could see a particular future homeowner feeling they were too big if they don't like large trees.
     
  17. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Ha ... they only get better with age.

    ;-)
     
  18. norain

    norain Member

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    im glad I get posting e mails .M.D.Vaden commented and it sent me a email reminding me of this place .lol so I may as well give an up date on my stuff .2013 winter I decided to leave everything outside in pots covered in snow . The weather did a 15 yr cycle we had - 20 for 2 weeks and the trees survived . I had a smaller one planted perhaps 12 inches high I had put a white plastic pail over it and it got buried in snow also and survived the cold. 3 trees I give to the local large tomatoe producing green house guy and hes going to keep them inside for a couple yrs and see if he can get them growing quicker I told him not to fertilize or it will kill them . Some times as the trees get larger on my property I give a little aged cow manure and the odd dog dropping those ones seem to do a little better .Other than that hope everyones trees and themselves are doing well. g.sewell
     
  19. dirt reaper

    dirt reaper Member

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    Picture taken 3/1/15. The entire 8 acres has changed so much over the last few years. The trees are really impressive.

    Funny thing, over the last few years I have lost a few trees. They seemed to be very healthy the last time I saw them. Then the next year, dead. Mystery or normal?
     

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  20. norain

    norain Member

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    Hi reaper .im no exspert .but with anything alive im guessing to lose some would be normal specially if you just let them to fend for themselves . You need to see if they were too dry . Not sure the area your growing in .
     
  21. norain

    norain Member

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    I notice you have cedar trees in the back ground .you must be in the north west . the don't have any rust color what so ever so im thinking water wasn't a problem .
     
  22. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Can't quite make out what the background trees are, but they're not cedars.
     
  23. norain

    norain Member

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    There is 2 pictures .I zoomed them up and im pretty sure those are cedar trees .I have the same type in my acreage . look at the one with the bent trunk. yester day I has some small sequoias with white buckets over them to help them through the winter .I removed the covers and all were in perfect health .I was pretty happy. I still have 2 feet of snow here in salmo b.c
     
  24. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Defintely not cedars, wrong bark and branch structure; compare here.

    As long as your young sequoias are covered by snow they'll be OK in winter, but in southeast BC they're going to get frost damage in bad winters once the top is exposed above the snow. Temperatures below about -27° to -30°C kill the foliage.
     
  25. norain

    norain Member

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    I don't think we have had -25 since I was a small child . we had -15 last yr first time in 20 yrs . we used buckets easy for the wife I was away northern alberta . I usely shovel snow over them start of winter . thanks for the info Michael nice to get conversation from this site every once in a while I tend to forget about this place.
     

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