Soil improvements ?

Discussion in 'Cornus (dogwoods)' started by lagr, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    Hello.
    I already have some dogwood edible plants and i am planning to plant some more.
    I did a soil test of my field and the results are:

    Soil type: Sand 57% - Clay 23% - Sludge 20%

    [0-30 cm] Depth
    • PH: 6.7
    • CaCo3 % (Bernard): Traces
    • Organic Material: 1.9%
    • P: 7 mg/kg
    • K: 87 mg/kg
    [30-60 cm] Depth
    • PH: 6.3
    • CaCo3 % (Bernard): Traces
    • Organic Material: -
    • P: 4 mg/kg
    • K: 67 mg/kg

    Can you suggest me on what improvements should i move on ?
    A friend told me that K should be a least 100 mg/kg.
    Is there a standard i should follow ? For example:
    P should be between 5 - 10 mg/kg
    K should be between 80 - 110 mg /kg

    Thank you.
     
  2. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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  3. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    Thank Sundrop.
    Of course having a healthy and 'alive' soil is the most important thing.
    But what can I do in my situation that mulching is not possible?
    Of course I am negative to the usage of chemicals fertilizers.
    Also according to the analysis do you thing that the specific elements P-K, CaCo3 needs adjustments?
     
  4. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    As for P and K I really don't know how much of it should be in the soil. The only soil test I ever did is by looking how my plants are performing. As for CaCo3, judging by the pH level, the amount is sufficient.

    There is what looks like a very good info how to interpret soil tests here http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/sites/default/files/soil_test_interpretation_ec1478.pdf They use ppm (parts per million) not mg/kg, but since 1
    part per million = 1 milligram/kilogram it should be no problem. I don't have time to analyze deeper the info there, but it looks that the results of testing may depend on the kind of the t
    est performed, so pay attention to that.
    According to the article it looks like your potassium is quite low.
     
  5. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    One more thing: your SOM is very low in the upper level of the soil, and alarmingly low (none) in subsoil (below 30 cm). I would definitely concentrate on improving the SOM and the soil organisms will take care of the soil fertility. My motto is: Do not tinker with the soil.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2016
  6. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    I have to mulch the field right ? One problem is that the field is on a slope and winter or spring rains are drift the added mulch. It would be a good choice if we add organic fertilizer in spring ?
     
  7. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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  8. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    Can you suggest me a cover crop ?
     
  9. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    I am afraid I can't. I don't know which cover crop seeds are available in your country, I don't know your climate, I don't know your soil. It is up to you to do the research and decide what would be the best in your particular case. There is plenty of websites with the information on green manures on the Net. Here is one of them Green Manures

    I recommend looking for the information about cover crops in your country language as well, since that information could be more relevant to your area.


    Consider also cover crops with a deep root system to break your subsoil and make topsoil deeper for your trees. With a strong, deep root system they will be able to get more nutrients and more moisture to satisfy their needs.

    As for organic fertilizers, yes, you can use them, too. Unlike synthetic fertilizers they do not have deleterious impact on the soil ecosystem.
     
  10. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    I thought that I have to select cover crop that have swallow root system to not interfere with dogwood roots.
    I have some options available for example:
    Red clover
    Hairy vetch
    Alfalfa

    Should a sοw also on the dripzone of each plant?
     
  11. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    If i choose for example one of the above option which are all available to me. Is there any possibility the green manure root system to compete with currently established 1 year old dogwood root system or its OK ?
    Thank you.
     
  12. lagr

    lagr New Member

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    Some agriculturist in my country suggest me to proceed with 80kg/1000sqm of phosphorous and 50kg/1000sqm of potassium in my field.. I am really confused as I have to plant the plants next week and don't know what to do..!
    I will proceed with sowing alfalfa and vetches at Monday.
    What do you suggest me to do?
     
  13. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest experimenting. It is the best way to learn and succeed in the long run.
     

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