Several leaves are wilted on my Acer pseudoplatanus 'Esk Sunset'

Discussion in 'Maples' started by SLR2009, May 18, 2017.

  1. SLR2009

    SLR2009 Member

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    Hey guys, My Eskimo Sunset Japanese Maple has been in the ground for 3 years and has been doing well. The tree gets full sun from the morning until about 1:30 in the afternoon and then it gets dappled light. This spring I recently noticed that several leaves have wilted. I can't recall if the tree has done this in the past. Does the tree look okay or is there a problem? I also notice some white coloration on the tree trunk. Is that anything?

    Thanks.
     

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  2. emery

    emery Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Pretty! I think it's OK, sometimes caterpillars or small borers can damage petioles and cause local issues like that, and it can be difficult to see the damage. I would cut off the wilted leaves to clean (meaning turgid) stems, as a precaution. The rest of the plant looks healthy.

    Mine is in a windy spot -- well almost everything is in a windy spot here! -- and sometimes there's a little breakage that causes similar issues.

    But let us know if you continue to see more wilt, and maybe take a close up of the stems where the wilt begins.

    cheers,

    -E
     
  3. SLR2009

    SLR2009 Member

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    Hey guys, the tree's condition continues to get much worse. Many leaves have lost their color and have fallen off the tree.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
     

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  4. JT1

    JT1 Well-Known Member

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    I think I see signs of maple petiole bore in photo 1 bottom just right of center, curling leaf with bulge in petiole with pink/purple coloration around the bulge.

    One way to check is get a razor blade and set leaf and petiole on a solid surface. Between the leaf and the bulge in the petiole cut the petiole letting the blade do the work (sometimes it helps to roll the petiole as the blade slowly cuts into and through the petiole, taking extra care not to crush it). If the petiole is hollow, you have petiole bores.

    Clean up all falling leaves and stems to keep larvae from spreading to the soil and coming back next year.

    In the past 5 years I have noticed these bores are not limited to sugar maples. I have found them in Acer shirasawanum and found 1 in my Acer palmatum that is in contact with the Acer shirasawanum. Here is a PDF about maple petiole bores.

    Curling and yellowing leaves can be a sign of too much water or not enough water (potassium deficiency). Get a 6" spike and work it into the roots downward. If only the first couple inches are moist but it is dry below, then your tree needs water. If the spike reveals total saturation or standing water at the bottom the tree is getting too much water. Most of the time this time of year it's very dry inside the root ball and rainfall is running off and not saturating the inner root ball. If this is the case work the spike into the root ball at the 12,3,6,9 o'clock positions and give the tree a slow deep watering. I have found that this is not just a problem with balled and burlap trees but also container grown trees are prone to this problem as well especially in larger container nursery trees.

    If the soil is moist and not dry or overly saturated, then check the leaf veins. If the newly turning leaf is yellow with green veins then it could be iron deficiency or other micronutrient deficiency. Get a soil test.
    If you don't have means to test, consider an iron treatment watered into the roots like ironite.

    Lastly if all else does not pan out it may just be growing pains as the tree gets established. Sometimes it can take up to 5 years before these trees become fully adapted to their new environment.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 27, 2017
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    A hideously ugly cultivar even at the best of times, let alone when diseased - I'd just get rid of it and take the opportunity to plant something more interesting in its place :-)
     
  6. wcutler

    wcutler Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Hey, Michael, that's so mean. SLR2009 seems to like his tree, as do a couple of the respondents here, and surely it does a nice job of brightening up a dark corner. And it makes it hard to appreciate your point that for the effort to revive a tree with only three years invested in it, it might be worth starting over. And it might still be worth figuring out what the problem is, so that the same problem would not happen with a replacement tree.
     
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  7. emery

    emery Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    This is obviously a very desirable tree as its popularity attests. However there is a group, in which perhaps Michael proudly counts himself, who simply don't like variegated plants. We can take his "contribution" :) in the humorous spirit in which is is no doubt intended.

    Anyway the tree is probably fine, variegated sycamores don't like too much sun and heat, and almost always look this way around this time of year. This is exacerbated by the fact that the tree isn't fully established. There's nothing much to do for it this year. You could try a systemic insect killer if they still sell those there.
     
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  8. JT1

    JT1 Well-Known Member

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    We have recently used this new neem designed for hydroponics. Instead of topical application, you water it into the roots systemically. This is good because oil sprayed on foliage this time of year will result in severe leaf damage. You need systemic control which this will cover most pest and disease problems.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000I1O7YQ/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    We usually don't recommend products without seasons of results. But in this case I would recommend it based on your needs and our good results using it on our collection of maples this season. Please note this is not off the shelf neem oil. It's a special formula that allows it to be mixed into water for hydroponics. Most oils separate from water. This formula allows it to become water soluble so that it is diluted and absorbed by the roots.

    Again, I stress not to buy a pure neem oil product to water into your roots. I am recommending a very specific product for this type of application.

    My wife said our local home Depot sells this brand, so you may find it locally if you are not a fan of online shopping.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2017
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd be reaching for the systemic herbicide . . . [big cheesy grin smiley]
     
  10. AlainK

    AlainK Active Member Forums Moderator Maple Society

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    There's a hypocritical situation about neem oil in France: it is forbidden to sell it as a fungicide or insect killer, but you can buy it as a cosmetic product : 1 litre for 17 € or so, which can be used for 50 litres of diluted product for treatment against various diseases and insects.

    Thus, organic farmers buy it, and use it the way they like ;-)

    I've heard a lot of praise from bonsai enthusiasts.
     
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  11. SLR2009

    SLR2009 Member

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    The tree looks a lot worse and I'm very concerned. Do you think it's dying?
     

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  12. SLR2009

    SLR2009 Member

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    I checked the soil and it felt a bit dry so I gave it a good soaking of water. Do you think it will die? What happens if all the leaves fall off the tree?
     
  13. emery

    emery Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hi SLR, I don't think the tree will die. This particular sycamore (Esk Sunset) likes a little more water than most of them. So watering some more won't hurt it. However this late in the season, be careful not to overwater: the soil should be able to dry out between soakings. This is not a species that likes wet feet.

    It is completely normal for a stressed or recently planted (which is the same as stressed) sycamore to lose it's leaves in September. We have several here which have lost leaves already because of drought, and these are well established trees. I'm not concerned for their long-term welfare.

    If the leaves drop, the tree will go dormant and leaf out again next spring. So long as the buds are green. If the buds turn brown, the tree is dying back and you will potentially need to prune. But I don't think that's going to be a problem for you.

    Cheers,

    -E
     

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