Sequoia growing zone?

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by keithdirt, Jan 24, 2005.

  1. fredmcain

    fredmcain Member

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    norain,

    Actually since I posted this about a week ago, I have stumbled across some new information bearing both "good news and bad". The fact is that there ARE two strains of giant Sequoia that were developed to withstand harder winters. One was developed at the Watnong nursery in New Jersey and is known as "Hazel Smith", guaranteed to thrive in zone 5. The other was devel0ped at the University of Idaho (UOI) and is known as "Idaho Endurance".

    Idaho Endurance has a fascinating history. Supposedly three small seedlings were donated to the university by no other than John Muir himself in the early 20th century. They thrived and grew to be quite large until a terrible freeze in the 1940s, I think it was. It was -45F for THREE nights in a row! Two died but the third lived and continued to thrive. The UOI sought and obtained registration for the cultivar hence the name "Idaho Endurance". Unfortunately, a professor at UOI told me something like "Unfortunately I don't have a way to get you any plants". He gave me the name of a nursery in Oregon who obtained some seeds. They told me that although they have a specimen growing there, they have no plans to propagate or sell them. :(

    As for Hazel Smith, the Watnong Nursery has evidently been out of business now for a number of years. I have found about a half dozen online nurseries who advertise Hazel Smith but then when I try and contact them about ordering it, I come to find out that the actually don't have it anymore. So, as far as obtaining seedlings, both these cultivars would appear to be NLA. That's the bad news. But, maybe we can get some seeds from the UOI? Maybe you should try it if you're good at germinating them.

    Although off topic from Sequoias, yesterday I started some red fir seeds. (Abies magnifca). I have never tried to do anything like this before so I don't know what to expect. They are actually pretty big - slightly larger than a watermelon seed. We'll see. The thing is, I get tons of nursery catalogs in the mail but they all offer the same things - all the same half dozen or so conifers. It could well be that if you really want something different or unique, you might have to look at propagation from seeds. We'll see.

    Regards,
    Fred M. Cain
     
  2. norain

    norain Member

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    salmo bc canada
    so interesting .Strange how something dosent get planted due to someones lack of interest at the university . Could have been a a whole new hardy tree for Canada and north usa .
     
  3. fredmcain

    fredmcain Member

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    norain,

    Yeah, I'm not sure whom to blame, really, the university or the nurseries. It would almost appear that the nurseries don't feel that these items would be profitable enough to go to the time and expense to produce and distribute them. As for the UOI, I don't know how well equipped they'd be to market something like this.

    The nursery involved was Buchholz & Buchholz if you want to try your luck at contacting them or, anyone else on this forum would be free to as well. Maybe if they were to get enough requests they might change their mind.

    Regards,
    Fred M. Cain
     

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