rose mutation

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by Sue S, Jun 2, 2006.

  1. Sue S

    Sue S Member

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    Nine years ago I received my first rose bush from my father-in-law for the birth of my third daughter. A lovely and meaningful gift that I had difficulty finding a home for the first 4 years of its life, thusly, I transplanted it equal number of times and then somet in its early years. I finally found a permanent home for the poor withered plant and have kept it there since. This (originally) peach and rose tinged hybrid tea rose has taken years recover from the abuse I inflicted on it early on. It is now a healthy hearty shrub that has completely mutated blooms from the original plant I received. It flowers in abundance, yet the color is now a solid deep rose color with a single row of petals. What specifically, of my abuse caused the mutation? Is there any way to reverse the mutation? Thanks.
     
  2. Margaret

    Margaret Active Member 10 Years

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    Sounds like it was grafted and the grafted section has now died leaving the original root stock. I am sure that someone will be able to give a more technical discription and will probably make a pretty good guess at the type of rose.
    Margaret
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2006
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Compare with 'Dr. Huey'.
     
  4. Laurie

    Laurie Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I also believe that what you have is root stock. Dr. Huey, probably the most commony used rootstock, is red and blooms once. If, for sentimental reasons, you would like to replace the rose, we can try to help you to identify which rose it was. It would be helpful to know if there was any fragrance. Roses are often categorized as pink blends or apricot blends, and it sounds as though yours was closer to a pink blend. You could page through a few books on roses, and some websites list their roses by color. Then at least you could let us know the name of a rose that is somewhat similar to the one you are looking for. Of course, all roses hybridized and released into the market after 1997 can be excluded from consideration.
     
  5. Sue S

    Sue S Member

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    Wow, that's amazing. Definitely Dr.Huey. So simple for you all...goes to show you my novice with roses and how I got here in the first place. The rose was called Chicago Peace. I have to say I didn't love the coloring on the original bloom...but would prefer keeping the original plant to replacing it with what it is supposed to be. (no way to get it back to its starting place, huh?) Thanks so much for your knowledge and sharing it with me.
     
  6. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    I agree. What you have is the rose that was the root stock. Dr. Huey is still the most commonly used root stocks for the large rose nurseries operating in California, which is where a lot of roses are grown commercially. No, you can't get your original rose back since, in all likelihood, the ornamental Chicago Peace that was grafted on would have died. But just in case, take a close look at all the branches that arise from the bottom of the rose. If you see a bulbous swollen part, low down near soil level, that could well be the bud union. If any canes arise from the swollen part or above it, than your original rose is still there. Double check and see if these canes, if any, has leaves that are different from the canes bearing the red flowers. If they are different, you are a real lucky lady! Then, all you need to do is to cut off all of the canes bearing the red flowers. All the energy will be directed to the ornamental part and make it grow.

    If you don't see any viable remnants of the original ornamental rose, then get rid of what you have and get another Chicago Peace. It is one of those roses which seem to be readily available on the market.
     
  7. Laurie

    Laurie Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I took this photograph of Chicago Peace for you last weekend when we were visiting a private garden of 500 roses in Tacoma, WA. What I found in my mom's garden in Zone 6, is that it is extremely difficult to remove the Dr. Huey once it has been growing for years. It is vigorous with huge and extensive roots, which is why it is chosen as understock for grafting, which can compete with other roses or plants nearby. If you would like to keep it for sentimental reasons, can you plant it in a pot or a really difficult spot to keep it controlled?
     

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  8. Sue S

    Sue S Member

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    thanks for the pic and the info...
     

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