Questions/Theories/Hypothesizes - RGH Benefits & Common Household Nutrients

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by newusr, Dec 23, 2015.

  1. newusr

    newusr New Member

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    UNTESTED THEORIES/HYPOTHESIZES

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    Using these two powders Cinnamon & Ground Mustard as micronutrients and PH up and PH down.

    Been looking at Google and have not found too much about using these or even other common household items as plant nutrient supplements.

    Will the actual "flavor" of these spices effect the overall finished product of tomatoes or other plants? Cinnamon may be nice, but mustard would probably be terrible.

    Cinnamon Nutrient Profile
    Cinnamon is alkaline (PH UP) I don't know how much is too much though per gallon...Cinnamon is also rich in magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, and potassium. It also has good amounts of sodium, iron, and manganese, along with small amounts of zinc, copper, and selenium. Another thing about cinnamon is that it has excellent fungicidal and pesticidal properties. The sodium may be the only bad thing in the cinnamon for our babies. Seems like it would be a great micro nutrient for flowering

    However, cinnamon is not water soluble, would the plant still uptake it's nutrients?
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    2 Tbsp
    Calcium 52.10 mg
    Copper 0.02 mgIron 0.43 mg
    Magnesium 3.12 mg
    Manganese 0.91 mg
    Phosphorus 3.33 mg
    Potassium 22.41 mg
    Selenium 0.16 mcg
    Sodium 0.52 mg
    Zinc 0.10 mg
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    Mustard Seeds Ground
    Mustard Seed Powder is very acidic, about the only acidic spice I could find that is low in salt. It also has pesticidal properties from what I have been reading. Despite the bad taste, it should be able to help bring your PH to a desired level.
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    2 Tbsp

    Calcium 10.64 mg
    Copper 0.03 mg
    Iron 0.37 mg
    Magnesium 14.80 mg
    Manganese 0.10 mg
    Phosphorus 33.12 mg
    Potassium 29.52 mg
    Selenium 8.32 mcg
    Sodium 0.52 mg
    Zinc 0.24 mg
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    Any other suggestions for common cheap store found items, for nutrients or PH Up or PH Down? I really just want input. I haven't even tried this yet, it may be flawed all together. I have not yet even put cinnamon powder into water to see how it effects the PH. Should I add a tablespoon to, lets say a gallon and see what it does.

    My other question/theory/hypothesis will be in the next post.
     
  2. newusr

    newusr New Member

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    It seems logical and somewhat practical, the theory is there; it seems like it would help stimulate root growth within soil. Am I right? Adding root growth hormone to your plants diet may be a good idea. I have no idea of what most powdered root growth hormones consists of. It does not seem harmful to plants. You can use them on your seeds to help them get started, or as we all know on the tips of clones.

    I just don't know how much would be a "large dose" to a plant. Would adding a light coating on the top of your soil before watering or towards the end, so it doesn't all leech out, be a good idea?

    I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with this? Maybe they could shed some light on this topic. I have been wanting to do this just to see how the plants react.

    Schultz Take Root
    indole-3butyric acid .1%
    Other Ingredients 99%
    Total Ingredients 100%

    Honey
    I was reading about honey as a Root Growth Hormone. Good for cloning. How about mixing it into your water?
     
  3. thanrose

    thanrose Active Member

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    Ground cinnamon is used by some folksy plant people as an antifungal. I don't know how effective. I've used milk, specifically nonfat dry milk barely coloring water as a powdery mildew retardant, and it seems to be effective. Also heard of using chamomile tea the same way. I don't know of anyone using cinnamon powder as a root growth hormone replacement.

    Like willow water, that old-timey advice of promoting root growth, these treatments may just be placebos. I guess the salicylic acid in the willow would reduce the fungi, and possibly there are active growth enzymes, maybe hormones, released, but then I also think talking to my seedlings helps. Carbon dioxide, y'know! Whatever, research does not support willow water as a treatment for rooting.

    As a soil additive or even a root dip, mustard would not impart any flavor to your tomatoes, nor would cinnamon or coffee grounds, or almost anything else. I've heard sugar does, but don't know. I mean, what sort of sugar would the tomatoes use, fructose? Sucrose? The only kitchen based additives I might use on tomatoes would be the milk spray when fungal problems advance, or crushed eggshells in the soil for any extra bit of calcium they release to fend off blossom end rot.

    In the end, without controlled research, there is no certainty of home remedies. Good compost and adequate drainage and adequate water and sunlight are the only things to be sure of.
     

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